Why Study International and Area Studies at New College?

The International and Area Studies AOC at New College is committed to training a new generation to enter the global arena with a comprehensive understanding of world affairs. To address the unique challenges of global interdependence, we have strong ties to allied fields within New College, including environmental and urban studies, political science, history, economics, anthropology, religion, literature and gender studies. In addition, a solid bond with New College’s language programs enables students to study the languages needed for their undergraduate research and future careers.

International and Area Studies area of concentration

In response to the challenges of global interdependence, the International and Area Studies (IAS) concentration is designed to meet the need for a new generation trained to enter the international arena with a comprehensive view of the international system and an in-depth understanding of a major region or issue in world affairs. The IAS area of concentration offers three tracks to meet a range of student interests and still provide solid training for future study or work in the area. The “area studies” track combines fundamental courses on the international political and economic systems with the student’s choice of specialization in a regional area; the “systemic track” focuses on a deeper understanding of the international political and economic systems; and the “issue” track is designed for students with a specific interest in a major international issue that affects more than one region (e.g., global health issues or peace and conflict).

The International Studies program offers the following tracks or focus within the IAS AOC: International and Area Studies, East Asian Studies, and European Studies. We also offer “slashes” or combined majors in the following areas: International and Area Studies, Asian Studies, East Asian Studies, and European Studies. Students completing an AOC or “slash” in International and Area Studies choose a track around which to focus their studies. (The track is not listed as part of the AOC on the transcript.)

View International and Area Studies Academic Learning Compact

View International and Area Studies courses offered in last 5 years

 

Area of Concentration Requirements

International and Area Studies – Area Studies Track

  1. Completion of the 5th-semester course (or equivalent) of a language appropriate to your area of specialization
  2. Intro to World Politics
  3. One Comparative Politics course
  4. Intro Microeconomics or Intro Macroeconomics
  5. International Economics or Development Economics
  6. At least 4 courses in your regional area of specialization, including the following:
    a. One non-language Humanities course
    b. One History course
    c. One non-History Social Science course
    d. One elective in any area

International and Area Studies – Systemic Track

  1. Completion of the 4th-semester course (or equivalent) of a foreign language
  2. Intro to World Politics
  3. One Comparative Politics course
  4. Race and Ethnicity in Global Perspective
  5. At least 3 of the following economics courses:
    a. Intro Microeconomics
    b. Intro Macroeconomics
    c. International Economics
    d. Development Economics
  6. Two Modern History courses
  7. One Environmental Politics course covering international or cross-border issues
  8. If possible, an ecology or science course dealing with a major global ecosystem (climate, oceans)

International and Area Studies – Issue Track

  1. Completion of the 4th-semester course (or equivalent) of a foreign language.
  2. Intro to World Politics.
  3. One Comparative Politics course.
  4. Intro Microeconomics or Intro Macroeconomics.
  5. International Economics or Development Economics.
  6. At least 4 courses in your issue of specialization, e.g. global health. The following activities may count for this course requirement:
    a. Courses taught here (usually on an occasional basis).
    b. Courses taken at other institutions, if they meet NCF standards.
    c. Courses taken abroad, if they meet NCF standards.
    d. Up to 2 tutorials.

East Asian Studies

  1. Completion of a 6th semester course (or equivalent) of Chinese (or another major East Asian language). Students must complete an advanced course or tutorial in the language during their senior year at New College.
  2. One Asian Humanities elective outside of language.
  3. The 2-course core History sequence on China (if specializing in China) or two Asian history courses, one of which must be the East Asian survey.
  4. One Politics course that addresses Asia.
  5. One Economics course that addresses developing countries or international economics (these courses require an intro level econ course).
  6. Three electives in any field covering Asia, one of which must focus on the pre-modern period. If appropriate to specialization, up to two of these electives may focus on the issues of developing countries.

European Studies

  1. Completion of a 6th semester course (or equivalent) of a major European language (culture/literature in the original).
  2. One other European literature, art, music, culture, or philosophy course
  3. The 2-course core history sequence on Modern Europe
  4. One Medieval or Renaissance course on Europe
  5. One Politics course that addresses Europe
  6. One Economics course that addresses Europe (e.g., international economics – these courses require an intro-level Economics course)
  7. Two electives in any field covering Europe

African Studies, Latin American, Middle Eastern Studies

Students wanting to complete an AOC in one of these areas are encouraged either to complete the International and Area Studies “area track” with a concentration in their regional area of choice or to design their own special combined majors with strong training in another discipline. They should consult with both their advisors and the Director of International Studies in designing such special majors.

For All Students with AOCs in International and Area Studies, East Asian Studies, and European Studies

Every student should study abroad for a semester or summer. (A full semester is preferable.) In unusual circumstances, another significant multicultural experience may be substituted for this requirement upon approval of the International Studies Committee and the student’s own baccalaureate committee. Language courses taken abroad may be counted to your requirements if they lead to at least as much progress as we would expect in a semester here. You are also likely to be taking a few area courses, which can count toward your area course requirements if they are substantial. (Please bring home your syllabi and copies of your work for your committee to review.)

Students completing a double major should not count more than two classes toward both majors.
The thesis or thesis project must be on an international or area studies topic.

At least two members of the affiliated faculty for the IAS program must be on your baccalaureate committee.
Strongly recommended: students should take a research design or methods course in the field most related to their thesis topic (normally the discipline of their thesis advisor). Please consult your potential thesis advisor about such a course prior to the second semester of your third year.

Strongly recommended: since language ability is essential to work in the international arena, students should continue to take language courses – either more advanced courses or a second language – throughout their study even after they have achieved the required level.

Recent Theses

  • #HumanRights: A Study of Social Media’s Utilization as a Tool for Progress and Revolution” by Aamna Dhillon
  • “Czechmate: Redefining the Relationship Between Bohemia and the German Empire, 973–1086” by Grayson Chester
  • “Deposits Grow, Disempowerment Lingers: Economic Status and Social Empowerment in a Women’s Self- Help Group Microfinance Program in Rajasthan, India” by Claire Comiskey
  • “A Regional Comparison of the Causes and Consequences of Differential Educational Outcomes in Rural China” by Naushin Jiwani
  • “It’s in the Air For You And Me’: Nuclear Power in France, Germany, Sweden and The United States after Chernobyl” by Casey Morell
  • “MADRE: An Ethnographic Study of Feminism, Social Change and Women’s Human rights” by Erica Lindegren
  • “Bon Voyage? Tourism and Development in the Caribbean: The Case of Barbados” by Nicole Whalen
  • “The Role of Guanxi in Chinese Economic Transition: Firm Networking & Market Autonomy” by Chelsea Dye

Joint Disciplinary AOC Requirements

International and Area Studies – Area Studies Track

  1. Completion of 3rd-semester course (or equivalent) of a foreign language
  2. Intro to World Politics or Comparative Politics course
  3. Intro Microeconomics or Intro Macroeconomics
  4. International Economics or Development Economics
  5. Three courses in your regional area of specialization, including at least one History course.

* Students combining IAS with an AOC in Political Science, Economics, or History will have already met some of the requirements above and should take additional courses outside of their AOC as substitutes.

International and Area Studies – Systemic Track

  1. Intro to World Politics
  2. One Comparative Politics course
  3. Intro Microeconomics or Intro Macroeconomics
  4. International Economics or Development Economics
  5. Two Modern History courses

* Students combining IAS with an AOC in Political Science, Economics, or History will have already met some of the requirements above and should take additional courses outside of their AOC as substitutes.

International and Area Studies – Issue Track

  1. Intro to World Politics
  2. One Comparative Politics course
  3. Intro Microeconomics or Intro Macroeconomics
  4. International Economics or Development Economics
  5. Three courses in your issue of specialization

* Students combining IAS with an AOC in Political Science or Economics will have already met some of the requirements above and should take additional courses outside of their AOC as substitutes.

East Asian Studies or Asian Studies*

If the disciplinary concentration you are combining is not in an Asian language and literature/culture:

  1. Completion of the third-semester course or equivalent of a major Asian language
  2. One Asian Humanities elective outside of language
  3. The two-course core history sequence on Chinese History (if specializing in China) or two Asian history courses, one of which must be a survey (History AOC’s should replace this requirement with 2 other electives, 1 of which is in Social Sciences)
  4. One Social Science elective (outside of the other AOC you are combining) that addresses Asia or developing countries
  5. One more elective on Asia in a Division outside of your AOC

If the disciplinary concentration you are combining is in an Asian language and literature/culture:

  1. One Asian Humanities elective outside of your AOC
  2. The 2-course core history sequence on Chinese History (if specializing in China) or two Asian history courses, one of which must be a survey
  3. Three Social Science electives that address Asia or developing countries (2 of them must be outside History)

* East Asian Studies slashes would choose an East Asian language, the China history sequence or the East Asian Survey and one other Asian history course (if not specializing in China), and at least two of their electives in East Asia.
* Asian Studies slashes may choose any major Asian language, any Asian history courses (one of which must be a survey), and any electives covering Asia.

European Studies

If the disciplinary concentration you are combining is not in a European language and literature:

  1. Completion of the third-semester course or equivalent of a major European language
  2. One European Humanities elective outside of language
  3. The 2-course core history sequence on Modern Europe (History AOC’s should replace this requirement with 2 other electives, one of which is in Social Sciences)
  4. Two Social Science electives (outside of the other AOC you are combining) that address Europe or developed countries.

If the disciplinary concentration you are combining is in a European language and literature:

  1. One European Humanities elective outside of your AOC
  2. The 2-course core history sequence on Modern Europe
  3. Three Social Science electives that address Europe or developed countries (2 of them must be outside History)

For All Students with Combined (“Slash”) AOCs in International and Area Studies, Asian Studies, East Asian Studies, and European Studies

Study abroad is highly recommended. Language courses taken abroad may be counted to your requirements if they lead to at least as much progress as we would expect in a semester here. You are also likely to be taking a few area courses, which can count toward your area course requirements if they are substantial. (Please bring home your syllabi and copies of your work for your committee to review.)

Students should not count more than one course to both their AOC and the “slash” (or to both halves of a combined AOC).

The thesis or thesis project should have some international or area studies content.

At least one faculty member affiliated with the IAS program must be on your baccalaureate committee
Recommended: Students completing a “slash” will normally be taking a research design or methods course in their AOC. Where this is not the case (or the student is combining two slashes), it is advisable to take a research design course in the field most related to their thesis topic (normally the discipline of their thesis advisor). Please consult your potential thesis advisor about such a course prior to the second semester of your third year.

Careers of International and Area Studies Graduates

Research Analyst
The Potomac Advocates, Washington, D.C.

International Admissions Specialist
Academy of Art University, San Francisco, California

SAMPLE PATHWAYS to complete AOC Requirements

These pathways show how you could complete the AOC requirements within four years at New College or within two years after earning an associate’s degree. Please consult with your academic adviser to determine the most appropriate courses for your area of concentration.