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APA Style

The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association  is the style manual of choice for writers, editors, students, and educators in the social and behavioral sciences. It provides invaluable guidance on all aspects of the writing process, from the ethics of authorship to the word choice that best reduces bias in language. Well-known for its authoritative and easy-to-use reference and citation system, the Publication Manual also offers guidance on choosing the headings, tables, figures, and tone that will result in strong, simple, and elegant scientific communication.

The American Psychological Association (APA) has a tutorial with helpful hints on using this style.

The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, is available in the Jane Bancroft Cook Library at BF 76.7 .P83 2010.

For sample Bibliographic References in APA style take a look at the USF Guide

Other helpful guides are available at:

Cornell University

Purdue Online Writing Lab

MLA Style

MLA style has been widely adopted by schools, academic departments, and instructors for over half a century. The association’s guidelines are also used by over 1,100 scholarly and literary journals, newsletters, and magazines and by many university and commercial presses. The MLA’s guidelines are followed throughout North America and in Brazil, China, India, Japan, Taiwan, and other countries around the world.

The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers is available in the Jane Bancroft Cook Library at LB2369 .G53 2009.

For sample Bibliographic References in MLA style take a look at the USF Guide .

Other helpful guides are available at:

Cornell University

Purdue Online Writing Lab

Other Helpful Sites about Citation

Council of Science Editors (CSE) Style Guide – The Ohio State University Libraries

Creating an Annotated Bibliography

How to Cite Digitized Sources (Library of Congress)

Research and Documentation Online – Diana Hacker

 

 

 

 

Chicago Style

The Chicago Manual of Style presents two basic documentation systems, the humanities style (notes and bibliography) and the author-date system. Choosing between the two often depends on subject matter and nature of sources cited, as each system is favored by different groups of scholars.

The humanities style is preferred by many in literature, history, and the arts. This style presents bibliographic information in notes and, often, a bibliography. It accommodates a variety of sources, including esoteric ones less appropriate to the author-date system.

The more concise author-date system has long been used by those in the physical, natural, and social sciences. In this system, sources are briefly cited in the text, usually in parentheses, by author’s last name and date of publication. The short citations are amplified in a list of references, where full bibliographic information is provided.

The Chicago Manual of Style is available in the Jane Bancroft Cook Library at Z 253 .U69 2010.

Other helpful guides are available at:

Chicago Manual of Style Online

Purdue Online Writing Lab

Other Citation Styles

American Sociological Society

Society for Biblical Literature