Kristopher Fennie

Assistant Professor of Epidemiology - Epidemiology - Gender Studies - Health, Culture and Societies - Interdisciplinary Programs - Natural Sciences

Kristopher Fennie

Ph.D.   Yale University
M.P.H. Yale University
M.Sc.   University of Alberta
B.A.     The Colorado College

Dr Fennie’s research interests centre on the intersection of behavioural and social determinants of health, particularly in the context of global health and vulnerable populations.  He has several years of experience working in the field of HIV disease with the goal of understanding how behaviour and societal context influence HIV outcomes, and thereby informing on how to improve health outcomes.  His research can be grouped into three integrated areas, within the context of behavioural and societal context:

  • Examining the role of internal and external stigma, trust, culture, and family influences on disclosure of HIV and injection drug use to partners and family
  • Assessing disparities in HIV prevention and care, focusing on stigma, racism, and racial residential segregation
  • Examining how stigma, poverty, and racism affect access to primary care, HIV testing, and HIV care among transgender individuals

He conducts research in the United States (namely Florida), and in Hunan, China.  He also is involved with the Yale China Association, and is part of its Health Advisory Committee.  His community activities include working with the Multicultural Health Institute, an organization that seeks to promote, educate, and ensure equal healthcare access for communities who are traditionally uninsured and receive a poor quality of care.

Recent courses

  • AIDS Epidemiology
  • Epidemiology Matters: An Introduction
  • Epidemiology II
  • Global Health and Humanity
  • Social Epidemiology

Selected publications

Gebrezgi, M. T., Fennie, K. P., Sheehan, D. M., Ibrahimou, B., Jones, S. G., Brock, P., Ladner, R. A., & Trepka, M. J. (2021). Predictors of chlamydia or gonorrhea among people with HIV in Miami-Dade County Ryan White Program in 2017. AIDS Care, 1–6. https://doi.org/10.1080/09540121.2021.1883510

Myers, K., Li, T., Baum, M., Ibanez, G., & Fennie, K. (2021). The individual, interactive, and syndemic effect of substance use, depression, education, and ethnicity on retention in HIV care. International Journal of STD & AIDS, 32(2), 184–193. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956462419890727

Zhang, K., Zhao, J., Li, X., Chen, X., Wang, H., Williams, A. B., & Fennie, K. (2019). Perceived Facilitators and Barriers regarding Partner Notification in People Living with HIV in Hunan, China: A Qualitative Study From the Patient Perspective. The Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care: JANAC, 30(6), 658–667. https://doi.org/10.1097/JNC.0000000000000093

Lutfi, K., Trepka, M. J., Fennie, K. P., Ibañez, G., & Gladwin, H. (2018). Racial Residential Segregation and STI Diagnosis Among Non-Hispanic Blacks, 2006-2010. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, 20(3), 577–583. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10903-017-0668-3

Xiao, X., Zhao, J., Tang, C., Li, X., Simoni, J. M., Wang, H., & Fennie, K. P. (2018). Psychometric testing of the consequences of an HIV disclosure instrument in Mandarin: A cross-sectional study of persons living with HIV in Hunan, China. Patient Preference and Adherence, 12, 1451–1459. https://doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S168571

Fennie, K. P., Trepka, M. J., Maddox, L. M., Lutfi, K., & Lieb, S. (2016). Comparison of Individual and Area Level Factors Between HIV-Infected Cisgender and Transgender Individuals in Florida (2006-2014). AIDS and Behavior, 20(10), 2186–2191. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-016-1308-y

Trepka, M. J., Fennie, K. P., Sheehan, D. M., Niyonsenga, T., Lieb, S., & Maddox, L. M. (2016). Racial-ethnic differences in all-cause and HIV mortality, Florida, 2000-2011. Annals of Epidemiology, 26(3), 176-182.e1. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2016.02.002

Fennie, K. P., Lutfi, K., Maddox, L. M., Lieb, S., & Trepka, M. J. (2015). Influence of residential segregation on survival after AIDS diagnosis among non-Hispanic blacks. Annals of Epidemiology, 25(2), 113–119, 119.e1. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2014.11.023