Jack Reilly

Associate Professor of Political Science - Data Science Program - Gender Studies - Political Science - Public Policy - Social Sciences

Jack Reilly
  • Phone: (941) 487-4578
  • Email: jreilly@ncf.edu
  • Office Location: SSC 205
  • Mail Location: SSC 102

Ph.D., M.A., University of California, Davis
B.A., Reed College

Personal Webpage

Professor Reilly teaches courses in American politics and political methodology. His research interests lie in the areas of political behavior, social networks, and political communication. In particular, he focuses on how the social context in which citizens are embedded influences their political choices, preferences, and behavior.

Interests:  political behavior, American politics, quantitative social science, complex systems

Courses:
Introduction to American Politics
Public Opinion
Campaigns, Elections, and Voting
Social Networks and the Context of Political Behavior
Modern American Political Realignment
Quantitative Political Analysis II
Research Design Workshop in Political Science

Publications:

  • “From Respondents to Networks: Bridging the Gap between Individuals, Discussants, and the Network in the Study of Political Discussion” (with Matthew T. Pietryka, Dan Maliniak, Patrick Miller, Ronald Rapoport, and Robert Huckfeldt.) 2017. Political Behavior.
  • “Social Connectedness and Political Behavior.” 2017. Research & Politics.
  • “Noise, Bias, and Expertise in Political Communication Networks” (with Robert Huckfeldt and Matthew T. Pietryka). 2014. Social Networks.
  • “Noise, Bias, and Expertise: The Dynamics of Becoming Informed” (with Robert Huck- feldt and Matthew T. Pietryka). 2014. Chapter 9 in T.K. Ahn, Robert Huckfeldt, and John B. Ryan, Experts, Activists, and Interdependent Citizens: Are Electorates Self-Educating? Cambridge.
  • “Opinion Leaders, Expertise, and the Complex Dynamics of Political Communication” (with Robert Huckfeldt and Matthew T. Pietryka). 2014. Chapter 10 in T.K. Ahn, Robert Huckfeldt, and John B. Ryan, Experts, Activists, and Interdependent Citizens: Are Electorates Self-Educating? Cambridge.
  • “Networks, Interdependence, and Social Influence in Politics.” (with Robert Huckfeldt, Jeffery J. Mondak, Matthew Hayes, and Matthew T. Pietryka). 2013. In The Oxford Handbook of Political Psychology, eds. Leonie Huddy, David O. Sears, and Jack Levy. New York: Oxford University Press.