Scholarships & Fellowships by Field

While some opportunities welcome applicants in all fields of study, others are open to candidates in particular fields of study or research or support specific career goals. Below you will find Scholarship opportunities listed by the field of study / career path.
To help you decide whether the opportunity in a particular field is right for you at the present stage of your academic career or to help you plan for future scholarship or funding opportunities, each opportunity is identified with one of the following indicators:

  • EEE = Educational Enrichment Experiences – opportunities for Undergraduates (sometimes Post-Graduates) to engage, typically for a summer, in a particular field of study – research in the sciences, exploration of international affairs, language learning – that enhances their undergraduate program of study and provides professional development or preparation for post-graduate study.
  • UG = Undergraduate Scholarships – financial assistance for students to continue their undergraduate studies. In general, scholarships recognize academic achievement and potential.
  • PG = Post-Graduate Scholarships – support for post-graduate degree or experiential learning opportunities.  Students can apply to these opportunities in their fourth-year as they are planning their post-graduate studies. There are both domestic and international opportunities.

Typically, applications for these opportunities requires two to three (or more) months of preparation – completing the application, drafting and revising statements, arranging for letters of recommendation.  Some require a preliminary and a formal interview; others require Institutional Endorsement.  Use the month indicated for the deadline to plan ahead.  Schedule a Fellowships & Scholarships appointment with the Assistant Director of Prestigious Fellowships through Handshake in myNCF.

  • All or Multiple Fields
  • Arts & Humanities
  • Diversity
  • Health Care
  • International Affairs
  • Language Study
  • Law
  • Public Service
  • STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics)
  • Social & Behavioral Sciences
  • Study Abroad

ALL or MULTIPLE FIELDS

Every year, the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) supports well over 100,000 German and international students and researchers around the globe – making it the world’s largest funding organisation of its kind.  DAAD scholarships are aimed primarily at graduates, doctoral students and postdocs and are awarded for study and research visits to universities and non-university research institutions in Germany. In some programmes, internships are also funded.  DAAD scholarships usually consist of a monthly scholarship payment (currently, for example, € 750 for undergraduates, € 850 for graduates and € 1,200 for doctoral/PhD students) and a flat-rate travel allowance. In many cases, DAAD also provides you with health, accident and personal liability insurance. Depending on scholarship programme, here are also additional benefits such as a one-off research allowance, family benefits or funds for language courses.  Program database can be searched here.
Deadline: November – see website for details.

EuroScholars is looking for outstanding and motivated advanced undergraduate, honors students from US / Canadian institutions who have a strong interest in an academic/research career. A GPA of 3.4 or higher is also required. Students do not need to have research experience, however, science students should have ample academic experience in a laboratory setting.  EuroScholars is a unique research abroad programme designed for advanced and talented undergraduate students from US and Canadian institutions looking for an international research experience in Europe. The EuroScholars Program offers these students to conduct research at one of the 5 internationally renowned European Research Universities. In this programme, students have the opportunity to undertake one course in the classroom and then work under the direct supervision of professors and other academic staff on a specific academic research project chosen by both the student and the faculty. There are an abundance of academic research projects in a variety of fields to choose from within the participating European universities.  EuroScholars is a once in a lifetime opportunity to for students to become familiar with the European academic culture and to investigate their potential in a future research career while enjoying the value of conducting research abroad as an undergraduate student.  The objectives of this programme are to give students the challenge of conducting original research at the cutting edge of human knowledge and promote interactions with scholars through immersion in the research environment. Students will learn about scientific reasoning, research methods, theoretical principles related to the research area, and scholarly communication. By finalizing the results of their research project into a paper of publishable quality, students will also improve their writing and presentation skills.
Deadline: October 1 / April 1 – see website for details.

The Fulbright U.S. Student Program* provides grants for individually designed study/research projects or for English Teaching Assistant Programs.  A candidate will submit a Statement of Grant Purpose defining activities to take place during one academic year in a participating country outside the U.S.During their grants, Fulbrighters will meet, work, live with and learn from the people of the host country, sharing daily experiences.  The program facilitates cultural exchange through direct interaction on an individual basis in the classroom, field, home, and in routine tasks, allowing the grantee to gain an appreciation of others’ viewpoints and beliefs, the way they do things, and the way they think. Through engagement in the community, the individual will interact with their hosts on a one-to-one basis in an atmosphere of openness, academic integrity, and intellectual freedom, thereby promoting mutual understanding. Grant lengths and dates vary by country.
Deadline: October – see website for details.
* Requires Institutional Review or Endorsement

The Gates Cambridge Scholarship programme offers 80 full-cost scholarships to outstanding applicants from countries outside the UK to pursue a full-time postgraduate degree in any subject available at the University of Cambridge. Approximately two-thirds of these awards will be offered to PhD students, with approximately 25 awards available in the US round and 55 available in the International round. The selection criteria are: outstanding intellectual ability; reasons for choice of course; a commitment to improving the lives of others; and leadership potential. The aim of the Gates Cambridge programme is to build a global network of future leaders committed to improving the lives of others.
Deadline: October – see website for details.

Since establishment of the Horizon Scholarship: Women in Defense in 1988, HORIZONS has awarded more than $565,000 to more than 155 women pursuing degrees ranging from law to engineering to math to public policy.  Awards are made based on academic achievement, participation in defense and national security activities, field of study, work experience, statements of interest, recommendations and financial need.  Recipients must periodically report on the award’s impact on their professional lives.  The National Defense Industrial Association, Women In Defense, and their members and partners are proud to invest in high-performing women to increase diversity and innovation in government, academia, and the defense industrial workforce.
Deadline:  March – see website for details.

 

The Humanity in Action (HIA) Fellowship brings together international groups of Fellows to study minority rights and produce original research exploring how and why individuals and societies, past and present, have resisted intolerance and protected democratic values. Separate programs take place for four weeks every summer in Amsterdam, Atlanta, Berlin, Copenhagen, Sarajevo, and Warsaw.
Deadline:  January – see website for details.

IRTS Summer Fellowship Program, the most notable student out-reach effort of IRTS, teaches up-and-coming communicators the realities of the business world through an expense-paid fellowship, which includes practical experience and career-planning advice. Each year college juniors, seniors and graduate students are selected nationwide to participate in the nine-week Summer Fellowship Program.  The Program begins with an extensive one-week orientation to broadcasting, cable, advertising, and interactive media. Fellows have a rare opportunity to question industry professionals at panels, lectures, and group discussions. They also take related field trips and learn career planning, networking and interviewing skills by attending industry social functions.  Following this first week, Fellows gain full-time “real world” experience at New York-based media corporations to which each is assigned for the duration of the nine-week Fellowship. Fellows are then able to reinforce or redefine specific career goals before settling into a permanent job in the media industry.
Deadline:  See website for details.

Marshall Scholarships* finance young Americans of high ability to study for a degree in the United Kingdom. Up to fifty Scholars are selected each year to study at graduate level at an UK institution in any field of study. As future leaders, with a lasting understanding of British society, Marshall Scholars strengthen the enduring relationship between the British and American peoples, their governments and their institutions. Marshall Scholars are talented, independent and wide-ranging, and their time as Scholars enhances their intellectual and personal growth. Their direct engagement with Britain through its best academic programmes contributes to their ultimate personal success. Programme Objectives: 1) To enable intellectually distinguished young Americans, their country’s future leaders, to study in the UK. 2) To help Scholars gain an understanding and appreciation of contemporary Britain. 3)   To contribute to the advancement of knowledge in science, technology, the humanities and social sciences and the creative arts at Britain’s centres of academic excellence. 4)  To motivate Scholars to act as ambassadors from the USA to the UK and vice versa throughout their lives thus strengthening British American understanding. 5) To promote the personal and academic fulfilment of each Scholar. Eligibility: Open only to United States citizens who (at the time they take up their Scholarship) hold a first degree from an accredited four-year college or university in the United States with a minimum GPA of 3.7. To qualify for awards tenable from October 2021, candidates must have graduated from their undergraduate college or university after April 2018.
Deadline: October – see website for details.
* Requires Institutional Review or Endorsement

The George J. Mitchell Scholarship* Program is a national, competitive scholarship sponsored by the US-Ireland Alliance. The George J. Mitchell Scholarship Program, named to honor former US Senator George Mitchell’s pivotal contribution to the Northern Ireland peace process, is designed to introduce and connect generations of future American leaders to the island of Ireland, while recognizing and fostering intellectual achievement, leadership, and a commitment to community and public service. Up to twelve Mitchell Scholars between the ages of 18 and 30 are chosen annually for one academic year of postgraduate study in any discipline offered by institutions of higher learning in Ireland and Northern Ireland. Applicants are judged on three criteria: scholarship, leadership, and a sustained commitment to community and public service. The Mitchell Scholarship Program provides tuition, accommodation, a stipend for living expenses and travel.
Deadline: 28 September 2020 – see website for details.
* Requires Institutional Review or Endorsement

The NIH Department of Bioethics offers a limited number of two-year post-doctoral and post-baccalaureate fellowships. Fellows participate in the activities and the intellectual life of our interdisciplinary department and study ethical issues related to biomedical research, clinical practice, genetics, biotechnology, public health, and health policy. They conduct mentored theoretical and empirical research on a range of bioethical fields of interest. For a typical fellow, this research yields multiple first-authored publications in premier academic journals. In addition to research and writing, fellows participate in weekly bioethics seminars, case conferences, ethics consultations, and IRB deliberations, and have access to multiple educational opportunities at NIH. No prior bioethics experience is required or expected.
Deadline:  January – see website for details.

The Spencer T. Olin Fellowship for Women at Washington University in St. Louis provides for full tuition for up to 4 years for women studying in the following fields: Architecture, Art, Arts and Sciences, Business Engineering, Medicine, Social Work.
Deadline:  January – see website for details.

The Rhodes Scholarships* are the oldest and most celebrated international fellowship awards in the world. Each year 32 young students from the United States are selected as Rhodes Scholars, through a decentralized process representing the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and the U.S. territories for the opportunity to study at Oxford University. Applicants from more than 320 American colleges and universities have been selected as Rhodes Scholars. In most years, even after a century of competition, a Rhodes Scholar is selected from an institution which has not formerly supplied a successful applicant. Rhodes Scholars are chosen not only for their outstanding scholarly achievements, but for their character, commitment to others and to the common good, and for their potential for leadership in whatever domains their careers may lead.
Deadline: October – see website for details.
* Requires Institutional Review or Endorsement

The Rotary Peace Fellowship is designed for leaders with work experience in peace and development. Our fellows are committed to community and international service and the pursuit of peace. Each year, The Rotary Foundation awards up to 50 fellowships for master’s degrees and 80 for certificate studies at premier universities. These are fully funded fellowships for dedicated leaders from around the world to study at one of our peace centers.  Through academic training, practice, and global networking opportunities, the Rotary Peace Centers program develops the capacity of peace and development professionals or practitioners to become experienced and effective catalysts for peace. The fellowships cover tuition and fees, room and board, round-trip transportation, and all internship and field-study expenses.
Deadline:  See website for details

The Leopold Schepp Foundation awards educational scholarships to full time undergraduate and graduate students who demonstrate a combination of fine character, academic excellence, financial need, compassion, a commitment to volunteerism and whose goal will benefit mankind.
Deadline: See website for details.

The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans program is intended for immigrants and children of immigrants in the United States. The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans program honors the contributions of immigrants and children of immigrants to the United States. Each year, we invest in the graduate education of 30 New Americans—immigrants and children of immigrants—who are poised to make significant contributions to US society, culture or their academic field. Each Fellow receives up to $90,000 in financial support over two years, and they join a lifelong community of New American Fellows.
Deadline: November – see website for details.

ThinkSwiss offers scholarships for a research stay in Switzerland. It supports highly motivated and qualified U.S. undergraduate and graduate students to do research at a public Swiss university or research institute for 2 to 3 months. The scholarship is open to students of all fields. The program provides a monthly scholarship of CHF 1,050 (approx. USD 1,000) for a period of 2 to 3 months (CHF 3,150 maximum), which covers two thirds of the average student’s living costs. By accepting this scholarship, you agree to participate in a blog to share your experiences during your research stay in Switzerland. After your return to the U.S. you also agree to carry out at least one activity as student “ambassador” to promote Swiss research. Half of the scholarship will be paid at the beginning and half at the end of your research stay, after your final report has been received. The program does not provide health, accident or liability insurance. Applicants must make sure that they have insurance coverage applicable for their stay in Switzerland.  While German, French or Italian language skills are not required for the research stay in Switzerland, knowledge of any of these languages would be helpful in daily life. The working language will generally be English.
Deadline:  March – see website for details.

ARTS & HUMANITIES

The Frank Huntington Beebe Fund for Musicians was established in 1932 under the terms of the will of Frank Huntington Beebe, a Boston philanthropist interested in music. The purpose of the Fund is to provide fellowships for gifted young musicians, generally performers and composers in classical disciplines, who wish to pursue advanced music study and performance abroad, usually in Europe. Fellowships are generally awarded to musicians based in the United States (although not necessarily U.S. citizens) at the outset of their professional lives, for whom this would be the first extended period of study abroad. A strong, well-planned project of study that will enhance the applicant’s life in music must be proposed. Enrollment in a school or university is not required unless such study is an essential part of the project.  Applicants must demonstrate a solid base of accomplishment in order to be considered and must not have reached the age of 30 by July 1, 2019. Note that Beebe Grants may NOT be combined with other, comparable grants, such as a Fulbright.  The Fund provides financial support for round trip transportation, living and other expenses. An all-inclusive grant of $22,000 will be offered. Fellowships are for one year and are generally not renewable.
Deadline: December – see website for details.

The Elie Wiesel Prize in Ethics Essay Contest challenges college students to analyze the urgent ethical issues confronting them in today’s complex world. Students are encouraged to write thought provoking personal essays that raise questions, single out issues and are rational arguments for ethical action.  Candidates must be registered undergraduate, full-time Juniors and Seniors at accredited four-year colleges or universities in the United States during the fall semester.  $5,000 FIRST PRIZE / $2,500 SECOND PRIZE /  $1,500 THIRD PRIZE  / TWO HONORABLE MENTIONS $500 EACH.
Deadline: December – see website for details.

Historic Deerfield, Inc. invites college juniors and seniors to apply for its nine-week, tuition-free Summer Fellowship Program in History and Material Culture. Located in the scenic Connecticut River Valley of western Massachusetts, Historic Deerfield is the perfect place to explore New England and regional history, material culture and museum studies.
Deadline: February – see website for details.

The James Madison Memorial Fellowship Foundation offers $24,000 James Madison Graduate Fellowships to individuals desiring to become outstanding teachers of the American Constitution at the secondary school level.
Deadline: March – see website for details.

The Kate Neal Kinley Memorial Fellowship provides support for students seeking advanced study in architecture, art, dance, landscape architecture, music, theatre, or urban and regional planning.  Three major fellowships are awarded:

  • One of up to $20,000 in any field of music
  • One of up to $20,000 in architectural design and history, art and design, dance, instrumental or vocal music, or theatre
  • One of up to $9,000 in architecture, art, dance, landscape architecture, theatre, or urban and regional planning
  • Up to three additional fellowships of lesser amounts may also be granted upon committee recommendations.

The fellowships are to be used by the recipients toward defraying the expenses of advanced study in the United States or abroad. The fellowships are open to graduates of the College of Fine and Applied Arts of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and to graduates of similar institutions of equal educational standing whose principal or major studies have been in the fields of architecture, art, dance, landscape architecture, music, theatre, and urban and regional planning.  Although there is no age limitation for applicants, other factors being equal, preference will be given to applicants who have not reached their 25th birthday.
Deadline: December – see website for details.

Metropolitan Museum of Art Internships – The Met has over forty department areas that host interns from a wide variety of academic backgrounds. Join a community of interns to gain professional skills and learn about museum practice. These internships are available to undergraduate and graduate students, as well as recent graduates. Internships for high school students are also available.

  • Summer Internships for Undergraduate and Graduate Students – Ten-week paid and unpaid internships for undergraduate and graduate students and recent graduates at The Met Fifth Avenue and The Met Cloisters.
  • Long-Term Internships for Recent Graduates – Nine-month and twelve-month internships (beginning in the summer) at The Met Fifth Avenue.
  • Fall- and Spring-Semester Internships for Undergraduate and Graduate Students – Unpaid fall- and spring-semester internships at The Met Fifth Avenue and The Met Cloisters for students currently enrolled in degree-granting programs or recent graduates. Applicants do not need a background in art history to apply. These internships are unpaid and require a commitment of twelve hours per week for ten weeks.
  • Graduate Internships in Objects Conservation – Internships for graduate students in The Met’s Department of Objects Conservation, a dynamic and diverse department with over twenty-five full-time conservators. Interns work alongside and learn from conservators under whose supervision they carry out in-depth treatment on a broad range of materials. These internships are unpaid.
  • Internships in Scientific Research – Internships in The Met’s Department of Scientific Research (DSR) offer undergraduate and graduate students opportunities to learn about the intersection of science and art, and develop practical skills working in a world-class cultural heritage science laboratory.

Deadline:  January – see website for details.

The Opera Foundation offers scholarships giving young American singers the opportunity to work and study at Europe’s most prestigious opera companies. Applicants who have been chosen to attend the Opera Foundation’s auditions compete for one of up to five scholarships. We offer scholarships for Berlin, Turin, Munich, and Amsterdam. Applicants may not choose one scholarship over the other or opt out of any one when applying. The Opera Foundation will conduct a single audition for all of our scholarships. Judges for the auditions include the senior representatives of Deutsche Oper Berlin, Teatro Regio Torino, Die Bayerische Staatsoper and Dutch National Opera. The scholarship competition is open to American citizens and permanent residents between the ages of 18 and 30 who are beginning their professional careers. Auditions are required.
Deadline:  June – see website for details.

The Tikvah Fund offers an intensive six-week seminar for college students living in America, Canada, or elsewhere in the Diaspora. Led by preeminent professors, rabbis, educators, and intellectual and political leaders, “The Jewish Idea: Morality, Politics, and Culture” will explore some of the most foundational Jewish teachings, including biblical and rabbinic texts, the lessons of Jewish history, the insights of modern Jewish thought, and the conversation between Jewish and Western ideas.Seminars will take place at the Tikvah Center in the heart of New York City’s Midtown East district. Participants will receive a generous stipend of $4,000.
Deadline: February – see website for details.

DIVERSITY

American Bar Foundation Summer Undergraduate Research Fellows will work in ABF’s office in Chicago during the Summer. We are particularly impressed by students who demonstrate a strong work ethic and intellectual curiosity, and who take initiative with mentors by asking questions and expressing a genuine interest in the subject matter. Preference will be given to candidates who aspire to be a first-generation law student.  This fellowship is designed to introduce undergraduate students to the rewards and demands of a research-oriented career in the field of law and/or social science, as well as to provide guidance about the many career options under the umbrella of the legal profession. Each Fellow will be assigned an ABF research professor who will involve the Fellow in his or her research project and act as a mentor during the Fellow’s tenure. In previous years, fellows have supported faculty members’ work by conducting archival research, creating literature reviews about minority groups in the legal profession, and coding qualitative data collected from interviews and newspaper reports.  Fellows also participate in a series of in-house seminars and field visits to get acquainted with the many facets of sociolegal research and the legal system, as well as create the opportunity for long-lasting professional relationships in the sociolegal field. Past Fellows interacted with attorneys at an international law firm and a boutique IP law firm, met one-on-one with admissions representatives from local law schools, observed criminal court proceedings, and visited social justice-oriented nonprofits like the Heartland Alliance and Uptown People’s Law Center.  All Fellows will work at the ABF’s office in Chicago on a full-time basis and receive a stipend of $3,600. The ABF will arrange and pay for housing in downtown Chicago during their stay and cover the costs of domestic transportation to and from Chicago.
Deadline:  February – see website for details.

American Medical Women’s Association offers various opportunities and scholarships for Women interested in pursuing careers in medicine.
Deadline:  See website for details.

The American Political Science Association Minority Fellows Program (MFP) is a fellowship competition for individuals from underrepresented backgrounds applying to or in the early stages of doctoral programs in political science. The MFP was established in 1969 (originally as the Black Graduate Student Fellowship) to increase the number of African American graduate students in the discipline. In 1979 the Chicano Student Fellowship was established. Overtime, the fellowship program has expanded to include support for racial and ethnic underrepresented scholars. Since its inception, the APSA MFP has designated more than 600 fellows and contributed to the successful completion of doctoral political science programs for over 100 individuals.
Deadline:  October – see website for details.

 

The Summer Training in Academic Research and Scholarship (STARS) Program is a distinguished summer research opportunity at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) for underrepresented in medicine (URM)* undergraduate rising juniors and seniors, and first-year medical students with a strong interest in pursuing advanced careers as research scientists, physicians and/or health care professionals. The program recruits students from around the US into an eight-week mentored summer program. The students participate in intensive hands-on training in research methods and practice directly in the labs of the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School’s leading researchers.
Deadline:  See website for details.

The CUPS program prepares a diverse body of students to consider public health as a career to ensure a future where the American public benefits from a more diverse and better trained public health workforce.  According to data from the 2017 National Population Projection Report of the U.S. Census Bureau, by 2045, more than half of all Americans will belong to a racial/ethnic minority group (any group other than non-Hispanic White alone).  A core area of study and practice during the internship is related to the health needs of U.S. minority and other populations who often are underserved and underrepresented in the field. During their internships, students work in a variety of public health settings including community organizations, health departments, university-based programs, and federal agencies.  Students display a variety of skills and knowledge including a focus on epidemiology, fundamentals of public health, minority health and health disparities, working with special populations, and biostatistics and statistical software. Multiple Locations.
See website for details and links to individual programs.

The mission of the Gateways to the Laboratory Program is to increase the number of students from backgrounds traditionally underrepresented in medicine and science who are prepared to become competitive applicants, successful MD-PhD students, and future leaders in biomedical research and academic medicine. Current college freshmen and sophomores who are members of groups historically underrepresented in medicine and science:

  • Individuals from racial and ethnic minorities
  • Individuals from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds
  • Individuals with disabilities

Students receive a stipend of $6,000, housing in Weill Cornell Medicine student housing (at no cost to them), and reimbursement for their travel expenses.  Additionally, financial support is provided for family to travel to and stay in NYC in order to attend the final Symposium.
Deadline:  See website for details.

 

The Greenlining Fellowship Program is an 11-month training program for emerging leaders interested in learning to take the lead on race and advocate for change on a systemic level. Fellows are assigned to specific policy program areas and develop expertise with the direction of a policy director and the Academy Director. Each Fellowship experience is unique and is shaped by the current policy focus of their program area. Although the curriculum is similar to that of the Associates program, Fellows are given more responsibility and independence to implement projects and programs. The learning environment is based on combining experiential learning opportunities, individual development and team participation. Fellows participate in leadership and skills development workshops, attend meetings with key stakeholders, and conduct site visits to community, government, and corporate entities. Fellows receive regular mentorship, professional and personal skill development, and are given opportunities to interact with the media, write reports/press releases, fundraise, testify at policy hearings, and participate in key meetings with top government officials, corporate CEOs, and political leaders.  Fellows participate in personal and professional development workshops that teach participants essential skills that will strengthen their capacity to contribute to their Greenlining experience as well as enhance their future opportunities.
Deadline: February – see website for details.

Since establishment of the Horizon Scholarship: Women in Defense in 1988, HORIZONS has awarded more than $565,000 to more than 155 women pursuing degrees ranging from law to engineering to math to public policy.  Awards are made based on academic achievement, participation in defense and national security activities, field of study, work experience, statements of interest, recommendations and financial need.  Recipients must periodically report on the award’s impact on their professional lives.  The National Defense Industrial Association, Women In Defense, and their members and partners are proud to invest in high-performing women to increase diversity and innovation in government, academia, and the defense industrial workforce.
Deadline:  March – see website for details.

The Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship (MLEF) Program provides students with educational opportunities to gain real-world, hands-on research experience with the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy. The MLEF program was created in 1995 with the goal of improving opportunities for under-represented and minority students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. All eligible candidates are encouraged to apply.  The mission of the MLEF program is to strengthen a diverse pipeline of future STEM professionals, and this program has mentored several hundred of the best and brightest students from across the nation for future careers in STEM.  As a MLEF participant, you will train under the mentorship of scientists and engineers while working on mission-focused research projects. During the 10-week appointment, you will receive a weekly stipend, and may be eligible for housing and travel allowances. You will also gain insight into how the Department of Energy is working to meet the energy challenges of the future.

Deadline: January – see website for details.

The McKnight Doctoral Fellowship program is designed to address the underrepresentation of African American and Hispanic faculty at colleges and universities in the state of Florida by increasing the pool of citizens qualified with Ph.D. degrees to teach at the college and university levels. As a by-product, it is expected that employment opportunities in industry will also be expanded.  Up to 50 Fellowships are awarded annually to study at one of nine participating Florida universities. Each award provides annual tuition up to $5,000 (tuition above this amount is waived by the participating institution) for each of three academic years plus an annual stipend of $12,000. (An additional two years of support at this same level is provided by the participating institution.) The award also includes a comprehensive system of counseling and professional development support.  Each annual renewal is contingent upon satisfactory performance and normal progress toward the Ph.D. degree. Eligible fields of study include any field in the Arts and Sciences, Business, Engineering, Health Sciences, Nursing, or the Visual and Performing Arts.
Deadline: January – see website for details.

The University of Arizona’s Minimizing Health Disparities (MHD) Undergraduate Summer Research Program offers summer research experience for students from underrepresented groups interested in careers in biomedical research, with a focus on minority health disparities.  10 weeks, $4,000 stipend, research credit, on-campus housing available.
Deadline:  January – see website for details.

The NIH Undergraduate Scholarship Program provides up to $20,000/year (renewable) for students from disadvantaged backgrounds who are interested in careers in biomedical, behavioral, or social science health-related research.
Deadline:  February – see website for details.

The National Medical Fellowship is offered primarily to first- and second-year U.S. medical students.  These scholarships are granted on the basis of financial need, providing financial assistance to United States citizens from groups currently under represented in the medical profession.
Deadline:  See website for details.

The Spencer T. Olin Fellowship for Women at Washington University in St. Louis provides for full tuition for up to 4 years for women studying in the following fields: Architecture, Art, Arts and Sciences, Business Engineering, Medicine, Social Work.
Deadline:  January – see website for details.

 

Point Foundation (Point) is the nation’s largest higher education scholarship-granting organization for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) students. Point’s multifaceted support of its scholarship recipients (“scholars”) extends far beyond direct financial contribution toward the cost of their education. Each scholar is paired with a mentor and participates in leadership development programs and events.  Point Foundation considers many factors when assessing scholarship applicants, including:  1) A proven track record of leadership and community involvement; 2) Strong academic achievement; 3) Working for the betterment of the LGBTQ community; and 4) Financial need.
Deadline: January – see website for details.

The Rangel Graduate Fellowship is a program that aims to attract and prepare outstanding young people for careers in the Foreign Service of the U.S. Department of State in which they can help formulate, represent and implement U.S. foreign policy. The Rangel Program selects outstanding Rangel Fellows annually in a highly competitive nationwide process and supports them through two years of graduate study, internships, mentoring, and professional development activities. This program encourages the application of members of minority groups historically underrepresented in the Foreign Service, women, and those with financial need. Fellows who successfully complete the program and Foreign Service entry requirements will receive appointments as Foreign Service Officers, in accordance with applicable law and State Department policy.
Deadline: September – see website for details.

Short-Term Research Experience for Underrepresented Persons (STEP-UP) Program provides hands-on summer research experience for high school and undergraduate students interested in exploring research careers.

  • 8 to 10 weeks of full-time research experience
  • Students receive a summer research stipend
  • Students are assigned to a STEP-UP Coordinating Center to help coordinate and monitor their summer research experience
  • Students are paired with experienced research mentors at institutions throughout the nation
  • Students are encouraged to choose a research institution and/or mentor near their hometown or within commuting distance of their residence. Students are not required to relocate in order to conduct their summer research.
  • Students receive training in the responsible conduct of research
  • All-paid travel expenses to the Annual STEP-UP Research Symposium held on NIH’s main campus in Bethesda, Maryland. Students are given the opportunity to conduct a formal oral and poster presentation.

The STEP-UP Program is a federally funded program managed and supported by the Office of Minority Health Research Coordination (OMHRC) in the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney (NIDDK) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The overall goal of STEP-UP is to build and sustain a biomedical, behavioral, clinical and social science research pipeline focused on NIDDK’s core mission areas of diabetes, endocrinology and metabolic diseases; digestive diseases and nutrition; kidney, urologic and hematologic diseases.
Deadline:  See website for details.

The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans program is intended for immigrants and children of immigrants in the United States. The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans program honors the contributions of immigrants and children of immigrants to the United States. Each year, we invest in the graduate education of 30 New Americans—immigrants and children of immigrants—who are poised to make significant contributions to US society, culture or their academic field. Each Fellow receives up to $90,000 in financial support over two years, and they join a lifelong community of New American Fellows.
Deadline: November – see website for details.

The Summer Health Professions Education Program (SHPEP) is a free summer enrichment program focused on improving access to information and resources for college students interested in the health professions. SHPEP’s goal is to strengthen the academic proficiency and career development of students underrepresented in the health professions and prepare them for a successful application and matriculation to health professions schools. These students include, but are not limited to, individuals who identify as African American/Black, American Indian and Alaska Native and Hispanic/Latino, and who are from communities of socioeconomic and educational disadvantage. SHPEP is implemented at 12 universities across the nation (Columbia University; Howard University; Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey; University of Alabama at Birmingham; University of California Los Angeles and Charles R. Drew University; University of Florida; University of Iowa; University of Louisville; University of Nebraska; University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston; University of Washington; Western University of Health Sciences).  Each institution provides scholars with academic enrichment in the basic sciences and math, clinical experiences, career development activities, learning and study skills seminars, and a financial planning workshop. Program sites vary on how they deliver each of these required components and their program start date.
Deadline:  See website for details.

 

The Summer Research Opportunities Program (SROP) is a gateway to graduate education at Big Ten Academic Alliance universities. The goal of the program is to increase the number of underrepresented students who pursue graduate study and research careers. SROP helps prepare undergraduates for graduate study through intensive research experiences with faculty mentors and enrichment activities.
Deadline:  March – see website for details.

UCLA PREP is a unique non-residential program designed to provide premedical students from disadvantaged backgrounds with the means to strengthening their ability and readiness to study medicine. Full participation in the UCLA PREP program allows participants to enhance their chances of being accepted to medical school and succeeding once there.
Deadline: March – see website for details.

 

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine seeks talented and motivated students who possess an interest in studying medicine.  The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine (UPSOM) would like to invite you to participate in our seven-week residential Summer Premedical Academic Enrichment Program (SPAEP).  This summer program is open to college sophomores who have completed Biology 1&2, Chemistry 1&2 (with labs) and accrued 60 credits with a science GPA of 3.6.  SPAEP is designed specifically to prepare and support talented and motivated student who wish to pursue careers in the profession of medicine. The program targets applicants who are traditionally underrepresented in medicine.  Program participants will spend seven weeks strengthening academic skills and enhancing their knowledge in science, scientific writing and public speaking through enrollment in two non-credit courses, MedBio and Med English.  They will also learn more about careers in medicine.  Participants will enjoy our small group learning environment that allows for one on one attention in a challenging and stimulating environment of a major academic medical center.  Students who are accepted to the SPAEP Program and meet program performance expectations will be recommended to apply for the Early Assurance Program. The application for Early Assurance Program is available once a student is recommended for consideration.  The Early Assurance Through SPAEP is a multi-summer residential program leading to matriculation into the UPSOM.  The MCAT for the Early Assurance Program Through SPAEP is waived.  Upon acceptance into the Early Assurance Program, enrollment in the next summer of SPAEP is required as is participation in the PROLOGUE to Medicine Program the summer prior to matriculation.  These summer experiences will provide additional academic support, mentoring, research, professional development and networking to the students.    The program for a second summer of research, career and professional development.
Deadline: February – see website for details.

 

HEALTH CARE (See STEM for Biomedical Research)

The week-long Adventures in Veterinary Medicine College Program is the perfect introduction for students interested in pursuing a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) degree. This exciting and intensive program is your opportunity to explore the wide variety of careers available within veterinary medicine and to learn more about veterinary medicine, surrounded by others who share your passion for animals, health, and science.   Program offers students the opportunity to:  1) Investigate specialty fields and important topics in veterinary medicine through informative lectures by Tufts faculty, staff, and vet students.  2) Shadow fourth-year veterinary students in the Foster Hospital for Small Animals, the Hospital for Large Animals, or the Tufts Wildlife Clinic.  3) Get valuable insight into what it takes to be a competitive veterinary school applicant and how to plan for the financial realities of vet school. Includes individualized admission counseling.    4) Build new skills as you work hands-on with animals on the Cummings School Farm, participate in laboratories, give a clinical exam to a dog, practice bandaging and suturing, and more.
Deadline:  March – see website for details.

American Medical Women’s Association offers various opportunities and scholarships for Women interested in pursuing careers in medicine.
Deadline:  See website for details.

The Summer Training in Academic Research and Scholarship (STARS) Program is a distinguished summer research opportunity at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) for underrepresented in medicine (URM)* undergraduate rising juniors and seniors, and first-year medical students with a strong interest in pursuing advanced careers as research scientists, physicians and/or health care professionals. The program recruits students from around the US into an eight-week mentored summer program. The students participate in intensive hands-on training in research methods and practice directly in the labs of the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School’s leading researchers.
Deadline:  See website for details.

The CUPS program prepares a diverse body of students to consider public health as a career to ensure a future where the American public benefits from a more diverse and better trained public health workforce.  According to data from the 2017 National Population Projection Report of the U.S. Census Bureau, by 2045, more than half of all Americans will belong to a racial/ethnic minority group (any group other than non-Hispanic White alone).  A core area of study and practice during the internship is related to the health needs of U.S. minority and other populations who often are underserved and underrepresented in the field. During their internships, students work in a variety of public health settings including community organizations, health departments, university-based programs, and federal agencies.  Students display a variety of skills and knowledge including a focus on epidemiology, fundamentals of public health, minority health and health disparities, working with special populations, and biostatistics and statistical software. Multiple Locations.
See website for details and links to individual programs.

The mission of the Gateways to the Laboratory Program is to increase the number of students from backgrounds traditionally underrepresented in medicine and science who are prepared to become competitive applicants, successful MD-PhD students, and future leaders in biomedical research and academic medicine. Current college freshmen and sophomores who are members of groups historically underrepresented in medicine and science:

  • Individuals from racial and ethnic minorities
  • Individuals from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds
  • Individuals with disabilities

Students receive a stipend of $6,000, housing in Weill Cornell Medicine student housing (at no cost to them), and reimbursement for their travel expenses.  Additionally, financial support is provided for family to travel to and stay in NYC in order to attend the final Symposium.
Deadline:  See website for details.

 

Georgetown University School of Medicine, a leader in medical education for over 150 years, offers this program for college undergraduates, post-bacc graduates, and current medical school students through the Georgetown Summer Medical Institute (GSMI). International students are welcome; courses are taught in English.  This program, combined with the excellent, informative and supportive environment at GUSOM, provides excellent preparation and insight for individuals exploring the calling of medicine as a career, and those making-up medical school courses.
Deadline:  June – see website for details.

Johns Hopkins University Summer Institute in Anatomy is a four week course that meets for 4 hours each day, 5 days a week. It is designed to give undergraduate and graduate students an introduction to all aspects of human anatomy, and includes demonstrations using human cadavers. A regional approach will be employed, beginning with the thorax and abdomen, continuing with the limbs, and ending with the head and neck. Lectures on each topic will be given in the morning, followed by prosection demonstrations (i.e., dissections prepared by departmental staff and presented to students) on human cadavers in the afternoon. Course materials will also involve hands-on work with human bones, various imaging modalities (e.g., radiographs, CT scans), and computer programs. Student performance will be evaluated by both written and practical (cadaver-based) exams. To allow individualized instruction, the course is limited in enrollment.
Deadline:  March – see website for details.

 

The Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation® (MHIF) offers one of the most outstanding and unique internship opportunities available to undergraduates who are pre-med or planning a career in medicine. The goal of the research internship program is to develop and empower the next generation of cardiovascular health professionals by offering a robust research experience in the field of cardiology. During this unique educational experience, the research intern is paired with a physician mentor who is actively engaged as a clinician and researcher at a nationally recognized hospital. At the conclusion of the program, the interns will showcase their research work at an open house and poster session. Many projects result in the intern having the opportunity to be an author on an article published in a national scientific journal. As well, some interns have the opportunity to present their work at a national cardiovascular conference.  Compensation: A $480 per week (less taxes) stipend paid bi-weekly to assist with expenses. We are not able to offer housing support. However, scholarship opportunities may be available for accepted applicants who need housing/transportation support.
Deadline: January – see website for details.

Offered primarily to first- and second-year U.S. medical students, National Medical Fellowships are granted on the basis of financial need, providing financial assistance to United States citizens from groups currently under-represented in the medical profession.
Deadline:  See website for details.

Gateway to Dentistry is  designed to introduce undergraduate students to the wide range of career options associated with the Dental Profession. UMDNJ – New Jersey Dental School offers all prospective applicants challenging and informative hands on dental experience. This is an intensive internship based at the New Jersey Dental School in Newark, New Jersey. Gateway to Dentistry is a 2-week interactive program that affords each participant a birds-eye exposure to the various aspects of the practice of dentistry.
Deadline:  October for January Program; January for May-June Program – see website for details.

 

The Academic Associate Program is a one- or two-year, full-time, paid program in the Northwell Health’s Department of Emergency Medicine, located only 30 minutes from New York City. This position is designed for post-undergraduates who are interested in clinical research, biostatistics, quality improvement and/or hospital administration. The program has five key areas of focus:

  • Healthcare administration
  • Research
  • Performance improvement
  • Information technology
  • Continuing Medical Education (CME)

This breadth of focus provides associates with a comprehensive perspective on the workings of an academic medical department. Academic Associates often apply to medical school but also go on to pursue other careers in fields such as public health, research and healthcare administration.  Associates gain exposure to many aspects of academic medicine. They work primarily with physicians but also collaborate with other healthcare professionals including administrators, statisticians, nurses and physician assistants. As a result, academic associates have a strong network of current and past fellows within the larger New York healthcare community.
Deadline:  See website for details.

 

Experience life as a New York College of Podiatric Medicine (NYCPM) medical student through the lens of the Pre-Health Internship Program (PHIP). This FREE three day PHIP will provide an in-depth introduction to the field of podiatric medicine through a balance of informational presentations and hands-on workshops.    Program includes :  A ‘Welcome Seminar’ led by a practicing Doctor of Podiatric Medicine (DPM); Shadowing opportunities in the Foot Center of New York and/or throughout private practices; Cases may include: Orthopedics, Vascular Disease, Podopediatrics, Surgery, Radiology, Geriatric Foot Care, Physical Therapy; Attend hands-on workshops that demonstrate the art of foot casting, competent suturing techniques and proper gait analysis; Meet with current NYCPM students; Participating in a variety of information sessions outlining sub-specialties in podiatric medicine; Hear directly from medical about student life at NYCPM; Overview of medical school interviews.
Deadline: April – see website for details.

 

For more than twenty five years, Summer Scholars participants have been preparing for the challenges and rewards of medical school. Twenty-four applicants are selected each year to participate in this rigorous five-week program designed to give you an intensive and realistic introduction to the first-year curriculum at the Heritage College.  In addition to traditional medical school curricula taught by medical college faculty, graduate students and upper-class medical students, the program focuses on case-based problem solving and small-group/team work. You’ll also benefit from special lectures, clinical experiences, and study and time management skill sessions in addition to workshops on cultural competency and research methods.  Although you won’t receive academic credit for this program, you will be evaluated by medical school faculty based on your class participation, test performance, general attitude and an assessment of your potential for success in the medical curriculum.
Deadline: See website for details.

Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine offers two summer programs. In the Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF), participants work in an active research laboratory under the guidance of a faculty mentor. This six-week program is designed to expose participants to the challenges, excitement and satisfaction of biomedical and basic science research.  The Summer Scholars is a rigorous premedical program that has been opening doors for students from disadvantaged backgrounds since 1982. The program is designed to enhance preparation for admission to medical school by immersing participants in activities similar to what they would encounter during their first year at the Heritage College. This includes a core curriculum of basic science courses taught by medical school faculty, study skills and time management workshops, clinical experiences and special presentations on cultural competency and research methods. In keeping with the educational culture at the Heritage College, all activities are designed to emphasize case-based problem solving and small group teamwork.
Deadline:  See website for details.

 

 

Oregon Health & Science University offers several summer research / experiential learning opportunities.
See website for details.

 

Summer Research Experience Program in Cancer Science.  Are you a college junior contemplating a research career choice that includes graduate school?  Consider a first-hand cancer research experience in the translational setting of a cancer center working full-time on an independent project of your choosing.  Your research experience will take place in the collaborative environment of a research laboratory. You will receive mentorship and insight into your desired future career by working alongside a research staff of graduate students, post-doctoral scholars and laboratory technicians. This core research experience will be fortified by laboratory skills-training, a weekly didactic lecture series on cancer biology and career development activities. Through these activities you will learn about current and cutting-edge topics; share in your discoveries peers; and explore science careers. In combination your research experience and supporting educational activities will help you to make an informed decision about and distinguish your application for graduate school. You will conclude your research experience by presenting your project in the formal settings of both the program research conference and “Buffalo Research Day.” Here you will hone your scientific communication skills and compete for awarded “Best Talks.” Throughout the program you will have the opportunity to bond with peers who have the same interest in science by attending planned social activities.  Specifically interested in tobacco research which leads to policy-making?  There is a special opportunity for students interested in tobacco regulatory science to participate in a research meeting/collaboration with WNY Center for Research on Flavored Tobacco Products (CRoFT) investigators at the University of Rochester Medical Center as part of the ten-week research program. 
Deadline:  January – see website for details.

St. George’s Med/Vet Summer Leadership Academy:  The premedical and preveterinary tracks combine lectures, field trips, and team-building events. You’ll even gain hands-on training in small-group sessions and lab work for an experience you will never forget — all on our beautiful campus on Grenada’s stunning True Blue peninsula that overlooks the Caribbean Sea.  Drawing upon SGU’s global expertise, CEPH-accredited Public Health program, and medical MBA program, students are introduced to international health care systems, global public health issues, and how the concept of “One Health, One Medicine” affects health care delivery throughout the world. For college students, the Medical Leadership program is a total of 12 days in Grenada. Qualifying participants will receive college credit through the School of Arts and Sciences from participation in lectures and clinical practicum sessions. Students are advised to arrive the day before the scheduled start date and depart the day after.
Deadline:  April – see website for details.

Short-Term Research Experience for Underrepresented Persons (STEP-UP) Program provides hands-on summer research experience for high school and undergraduate students interested in exploring research careers.

  • 8 to 10 weeks of full-time research experience
  • Students receive a summer research stipend
  • Students are assigned to a STEP-UP Coordinating Center to help coordinate and monitor their summer research experience
  • Students are paired with experienced research mentors at institutions throughout the nation
  • Students are encouraged to choose a research institution and/or mentor near their hometown or within commuting distance of their residence. Students are not required to relocate in order to conduct their summer research.
  • Students receive training in the responsible conduct of research
  • All-paid travel expenses to the Annual STEP-UP Research Symposium held on NIH’s main campus in Bethesda, Maryland. Students are given the opportunity to conduct a formal oral and poster presentation.

The STEP-UP Program is a federally funded program managed and supported by the Office of Minority Health Research Coordination (OMHRC) in the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney (NIDDK) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The overall goal of STEP-UP is to build and sustain a biomedical, behavioral, clinical and social science research pipeline focused on NIDDK’s core mission areas of diabetes, endocrinology and metabolic diseases; digestive diseases and nutrition; kidney, urologic and hematologic diseases.
Deadline:  See website for details.

 

The Summer Health Professions Education Program (SHPEP) is a free summer enrichment program focused on improving access to information and resources for college students interested in the health professions. SHPEP’s goal is to strengthen the academic proficiency and career development of students underrepresented in the health professions and prepare them for a successful application and matriculation to health professions schools. These students include, but are not limited to, individuals who identify as African American/Black, American Indian and Alaska Native and Hispanic/Latino, and who are from communities of socioeconomic and educational disadvantage. SHPEP is implemented at 12 universities across the nation (Columbia University; Howard University; Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey; University of Alabama at Birmingham; University of California Los Angeles and Charles R. Drew University; University of Florida; University of Iowa; University of Louisville; University of Nebraska; University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston; University of Washington; Western University of Health Sciences).  Each institution provides scholars with academic enrichment in the basic sciences and math, clinical experiences, career development activities, learning and study skills seminars, and a financial planning workshop. Program sites vary on how they deliver each of these required components and their program start date.
Deadline:  See website for details.

 

The Summer Public Health Scholars Program (SPHSP) is designed for undergraduate students and its goal is to increase interest in and knowledge of public health and biomedical science careers. SPHSP is a partnership of the Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, College of Dental Medicine, School of Nursing, and the Mailman School of Public Health. Together, they represent the broad spectrum of public health practice. SPHSP was awarded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Office of Minority Health, and Health Equity (OMHHE), under the CDC Undergraduate Public Health Scholars Program (CUPS).  The program is designed for undergraduates entering their junior or senior year and recent baccalaureate degree students who are undecided about their career goals. This is a rigorous program which includes Public Health coursework at Columbia University; hands-on field experience and immersion in a diverse, economically disadvantaged urban environment; seminars and lectures with public health leaders; and mentoring by faculty members, ensuring students’ exposure to the breadth and importance of public health as a career option.
Deadline:  See website for details.

MICHIGAN HEALTH SCIENCES UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH ACADEMY – The Institute is designed to develop the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC Core Competencies).  The URA curricula are aligned to the core competencies that are fundamental to preparing students to be future healthcare professionals.  Diversity is essential in addressing today’s health disparities – from the students who train to become tomorrow’s scientists and physicians, to the patients who will benefit from their research and care. The Michigan Health Sciences Undergraduate Research Academy (MHSURA) is designed for undergraduate students who want to explore biomedical research and health professional career pathways in a stimulating and inclusive environment.
Deadline:  February – see website for details.

 

Each year the makers of TYLENOL® award Tylenol Future Care Scholarships to well deserving students pursuing careers in healthcare. Twenty-three years and over eight million dollars later, we’re proud to continue a tradition that supports those dedicated to a lifetime of caring for others.
Deadline:  See website for details.

Open to all, the UC Berkeley School of Optometry Opto-Camp is a five-day “in-residence” program that provides participants with opportunities to learn about the profession of optometry and the process of becoming an optometrist. A goal of Opto-Camp is to provide in-depth information about Optometry as a career track to those who are underrepresented in the profession and/or first-generation college students.
Deadline:  May – see website for details.

 

UCLA PREP is a unique non-residential program designed to provide premedical students from disadvantaged backgrounds with the means to strengthening their ability and readiness to study medicine. Full participation in the UCLA PREP program allows participants to enhance their chances of being accepted to medical school and succeeding once there.
Deadline: March – see website for details.

The University of Cincinnati Medical School Summer/Enrichment Programs SURF Programs are designed for sophomore and junior level students who are US residents and interested in scientific research and thinking about a career in Biomedical Research.  Students must be able to commit to a 10 week program to do a research internship.  SURF students are matched with an appropriate faculty advisor, based on mutual research interest. The advisor and intern design a specific research project within the context of the research focus of the advisor’s laboratory. We typically award fellowships to 150 undergrads each summer to do clinical, translational, or basic biomedical research.
Deadline:  See website for details.

University of Connecticut School of Medicine Medical/Dental Preparatory Program for college sophomores, juniors, seniors or recent graduates provides a six-week summer program consisting of two tracks.  Track One MCAT/DAT Preparation Program is for students who will be taking the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) or Dental Admission Test (DAT). The program focuses on MCAT/DAT test preparation, clinical interaction with preceptors and introduction to problem based learning through case studies.  Track Two Basic Medical Science Program is for all other students not on Track One. This track consists of basic medical science courses emphasizing essential principals of cell and molecular biology correlated to problem based learning case studies. Clinical experiences and professional development exercises are also presented.  The program has two purposes (a) to facilitate the entry of these students into medical and dental schools by improving their performance on admissions tests and through professional development activities and (b) to increase the retention of successful matriculants to professional schools through early exposure to professional education.  Program provides housing, meals and a stipend.
Deadline:  March – see website for details.

The purpose of Profile for Success (PFS) is to assist junior and senior level college students and recent graduates through the admissions process for dental school. Program participants will also have an opportunity to increase their knowledge of career opportunities within dentistry. PFS targets college juniors, seniors, recent graduates, or individuals making a career transition who are on track to enter dental school the academic year following their participation. Preparation for the DAT is the main focus of this program. Participants will spend the majority of their time in test preparatory classes or facilitated study groups. In addition to test preparation, students participate in admissions workshops, simulated clinical and lab experiences, panel discussions on health disparities and lectures about various careers in dentistry. Each participant is assigned a dental student mentor, and there are formal and informal opportunities for participants to interact with faculty and staff.  Travel to and from the University of Michigan, as well as on campus housing, is provided by the program for all participants. Participants will also receive a stipend to cover living expenses.  Admission to PFS is selective and highly competitive. Candidates selected to participate in PFS are expected to fully engage in, focus on, and commit to all activities for the duration of the program.  All program participants are required to live on campus during the program. Participants are expected to commit and engage in the learning process for the duration of the program.  Attendance is required for all program activities including but not limited to: pre-clinical experiences, courses, workshops, speaker presentations, and meetings with faculty, staff, and mentors. Additionally, some weekend and evening events are required to ensure maximum benefit from the program.  As a participant, you must commit to taking advantage of the various opportunities made available to facilitate your entry into the dental professions.
Deadline:  March – see website for details.

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine seeks talented and motivated students who possess an interest in studying medicine.  The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine (UPSOM) would like to invite you to participate in our seven-week residential Summer Premedical Academic Enrichment Program (SPAEP).  This summer program is open to college sophomores who have completed Biology 1&2, Chemistry 1&2 (with labs) and accrued 60 credits with a science GPA of 3.6.  SPAEP is designed specifically to prepare and support talented and motivated student who wish to pursue careers in the profession of medicine. The program targets applicants who are traditionally underrepresented in medicine.  Program participants will spend seven weeks strengthening academic skills and enhancing their knowledge in science, scientific writing and public speaking through enrollment in two non-credit courses, MedBio and Med English.  They will also learn more about careers in medicine.  Participants will enjoy our small group learning environment that allows for one on one attention in a challenging and stimulating environment of a major academic medical center.  Students who are accepted to the SPAEP Program and meet program performance expectations will be recommended to apply for the Early Assurance Program. The application for Early Assurance Program is available once a student is recommended for consideration.  The Early Assurance Through SPAEP is a multi-summer residential program leading to matriculation into the UPSOM.  The MCAT for the Early Assurance Program Through SPAEP is waived.  Upon acceptance into the Early Assurance Program, enrollment in the next summer of SPAEP is required as is participation in the PROLOGUE to Medicine Program the summer prior to matriculation.  These summer experiences will provide additional academic support, mentoring, research, professional development and networking to the students.    The program for a second summer of research, career and professional development.
Deadline: February – see website for details.

 

The Travelers Summer Research Fellowship Program is designed to give 25 premedical students deeper insights into the field of medicine, including issues that greatly affect the health of traditionally underserved groups. Through the experiences of laboratory or clinical research, the student learns how one pursues a specific research problem under the supervision of a faculty member, thus providing an early education into basic research techniques that could be applicable to any area of medicine. A lecture series explores topics in cardiovascular physiology, exposing the students to basic science concepts that are relevant to a more specific understanding of hypertension and cardiovascular disease, both of which are major problems in minority communities. The summer fellows attend a series of talks by minority physicians about various medical specialties, addressing issues of concern in these physician’s daily work plus views of the bigger picture in health care to minority communities. Shadowing physicians provide further exposure to the clinical facets of medicine. Students in the summer program receive information on the medical school admissions process, and counseling on financial planning for medical school and how to examine the financial aid package.
Deadline: February – see website for details.

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS

Each year, through the James C. Gaither Junior Fellows Program, the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace offers approximately 11-13 one-year fellowships to uniquely qualified graduating seniors and individuals who have graduated during the past academic year.  James C. Gaither Junior Fellows provide research assistance to scholars working in Carnegie programs. You may learn more about our programs by visiting Carnegie’s homepage Gaither Junior Fellows have the opportunity to conduct research for books, co-author journal articles and policy papers, participate in meetings with high-level officials, contribute to congressional testimony, and organize briefings attended by scholars, journalists, and government officials.
Deadline:  January – see website for details.

The USAID Donald M. Payne International Development Graduate Fellowship Program seeks to attract outstanding individuals who are interested in pursuing careers in the Foreign Service of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). If you want to work on the front lines of some of the most pressing global challenges of our times — poverty, hunger, injustice, disease, environmental degradation, climate change, conflict and violent extremism – the Foreign Service of the U.S. Agency for International Development provides an opportunity to advance U.S. foreign policy interests and reflect the American people’s compassion and support of human dignity. The Payne Fellowship, which provides up to $96,000 in benefits over two years for graduate school, internships, and professional development activities, is a unique pathway to the USAID Foreign Service.
Deadline:  November – see website for details.

The Thomas R. Pickering Fellowship offers a unique opportunity to promote positive change in the world.  Upon successful completion of a two-year master’s degree program and fulfillment of Foreign Service entry requirements, fellows have the opportunity to work as Foreign Service Officers with the U.S. Department of State, in accordance with applicable law and State Department policy, serving in Washington, DC or at a U.S. embassy, consulate, or diplomatic mission around the globe.
Deadline: September – see website for details.

The PPIA Junior Summer Institutes (JSI) provides an intensive seven-week summer program that focuses on preparing students for graduate programs in public and international affairs and careers as policy professionals, public administrators and other leadership roles in public service. The JSI curriculum includes economics, statistics, domestic/international policy issues and leadership topics, all designed to sharpen the students’ quantitative, analytic and communication skills. Extracurricular activities are also included. Fellows  receive full tuition at a PPIA Junior Summer Institute; eligibility to receive assistance with travel expenses; a stipend of up to $1,500 (funding determined by each JSI); university housing with a meal plan; books and related course materials; and GRE preparation (may require cost-sharing by participating students).
Deadline: See website for details.

The Rangel Graduate Fellowship is a program that aims to attract and prepare outstanding young people for careers in the Foreign Service of the U.S. Department of State in which they can help formulate, represent and implement U.S. foreign policy. The Rangel Program selects outstanding Rangel Fellows annually in a highly competitive nationwide process and supports them through two years of graduate study, internships, mentoring, and professional development activities. This program encourages the application of members of minority groups historically underrepresented in the Foreign Service, women, and those with financial need. Fellows who successfully complete the program and Foreign Service entry requirements will receive appointments as Foreign Service Officers, in accordance with applicable law and State Department policy.
Deadline: September – see website for details.

LANGUAGE STUDY

The American Research Institute in Turkey will offer 15 fellowships for advanced students for participation in the summer program in intensive advanced Turkish language at Boğaziçi University in Istanbul. This intensive program offers the equivalent of one full academic year of study in Turkish at the college level. The fellowships cover round-trip airfare to Istanbul, application and tuition fees, and a maintenance stipend. Applicants must be a citizen, national, or permanent resident of the United States and be currently enrolled in an undergraduate or graduate level academic program, or be faculty.
Deadline: February – see website for details.

The Blakemore Freeman Scholarship provides funding support for one-year of full-time post-graduate intensive language study in specific Asian Languages (Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Thai, Vietnamese, Indonesian, Khmer, Burmese) at specific Asian institutions.  To be eligible, candidates must must have a focused, well-defined career objective involving Asia in which regular use of the language is an important aspect, the potential to make a significant contribution to a field of study or area of professional or business activity in an Asian country, prior experience in the Asian country or involvement or participation in activities related to the country, and good academic, professional or business background, appropriate to the career program.
Deadline: December – see website for details.

Boren Scholars (UG) and Fellows (PG) study a wide range of critical languages, including Arabic, Chinese, Portuguese, and Swahili. Boren Awards are available to students of all proficiency levels who are committed to enhancing their skills.  Boren Scholars and Fellows from diverse fields of study immerse themselves in the cultures in world regions underrepresented in study abroad, including Africa, Asia, Eurasia, Latin America, and the Middle East.  Boren Awards alumni are committed to public service, working in positions critical to U.S. national security throughout the Federal Government, including the Departments of State, Defense, and Homeland Security, and USAID.
Deadline: January(PG) / February(UG) – see website for details.

The Critical Language Scholarship (CLS) Program is a summer study abroad opportunity for American college and university students to learn languages essential to America’s engagement with the world. Languages” Arabic, Azerbaijani, Bangla, Chinese, Hindi, Indonesian, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Punjabi, Russian, Swahili, Turkish, Urdu.
Deadline: November – see website for details.

The 100 annual Davis Fellows for Peace fellowships are intended for exceptionally qualified individuals with demonstrated interest in one or more of the following areas: international, global, or area studies; international politics and economics; peace and security studies; and/or conflict resolution. Those in other fields, including working professionals, are encouraged to apply if their field of expertise requires them to study one of the languages offered. Established in 2007, the Fellows for Peace awards cover tuition, room, and board for one summer in any of the 11 Language Schools at any level of study (Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Abenaki – Pilot). The award does not cover travel, books, or incidentals. The fellowships are highly competitive, merit-based awards available to all applicants.
Deadline:  January – see website for details.

 

The Qatar Scholarship program offers Arabic language students from the U.S. who have already developed their Arabic at the intermediate and advanced levels the opportunity to master their skills in an intensive Arabic language program at Qatar University in Doha for an entire academic year. The scholarship includes tuition, room and board, RT airfare, local transportation and books. All applicants must apply directly through Qatar University.
Deadline: March – see website for details.

LAW

American Bar Foundation Summer Undergraduate Research Fellows will work in ABF’s office in Chicago during the Summer. We are particularly impressed by students who demonstrate a strong work ethic and intellectual curiosity, and who take initiative with mentors by asking questions and expressing a genuine interest in the subject matter. Preference will be given to candidates who aspire to be a first-generation law student.  This fellowship is designed to introduce undergraduate students to the rewards and demands of a research-oriented career in the field of law and/or social science, as well as to provide guidance about the many career options under the umbrella of the legal profession. Each Fellow will be assigned an ABF research professor who will involve the Fellow in his or her research project and act as a mentor during the Fellow’s tenure. In previous years, fellows have supported faculty members’ work by conducting archival research, creating literature reviews about minority groups in the legal profession, and coding qualitative data collected from interviews and newspaper reports.  Fellows also participate in a series of in-house seminars and field visits to get acquainted with the many facets of sociolegal research and the legal system, as well as create the opportunity for long-lasting professional relationships in the sociolegal field. Past Fellows interacted with attorneys at an international law firm and a boutique IP law firm, met one-on-one with admissions representatives from local law schools, observed criminal court proceedings, and visited social justice-oriented nonprofits like the Heartland Alliance and Uptown People’s Law Center.  All Fellows will work at the ABF’s office in Chicago on a full-time basis and receive a stipend of $3,600. The ABF will arrange and pay for housing in downtown Chicago during their stay and cover the costs of domestic transportation to and from Chicago.
Deadline:  February – see website for details.

 

The Harry A. Blackmun Scholarship may be awarded to a law student enrolled in or about to enroll in the pursuit of a juris doctor degree at an accredited law school in the United States. The recipient will be chosen based on several factors, including academic achievement, financial need, and potential for making a contribution to society and the legal profession. In addition, because the scholarship will be granted in honor of Justice Blackmun, all other considerations being equal, preference will be given to applicants with a significant tie to the Justice’s home state of Minnesota.
Deadline: June – see website for details.

Application materials can be requested from Harry A. Blackmun Scholarship Foundation, Inc., 118 Mulberry Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-3600

The Supreme Court Judicial Internship in an unpaid 16-week (Fall & Spring – Summer internship 12 weeks) internship experience in the Supreme Court.  The Program offers advanced undergraduates and graduating seniors who have interests in law, management, and social sciences a unique opportunity to gain exposure to the field of judicial administration through work in the Office of the Counselor to the Chief Justice. Interns work eight-hour days, five days a week. Thus, other employment is not feasible. Judicial  Interns perform several routine but important office tasks, which include summarizing news articles and preparing memoranda and correspondence. Interns also conduct background research for speeches and briefings provided to visiting foreign dignitaries. Additionally, interns may participate in the diverse  research projects conducted by the Supreme Court Fellow and the Counselor. These projects require interns to gather, assemble and synthesize information from a wide range of sources. Such assignments demand experience with office and library resources, the ability to work under time constraints, strict attention to detail, creative thinking, and editorial skills. Office research is completely unrelated to the case work of the Supreme Court. Interns do not work on cases pending before the Court or with the Justices. Circumstances permitting and with approval, interns may also take advantage of the Court’s extensive resources to work on their own academic or other research projects.
Deadline:
Fall: June 10; Spring: Oct. 20; Summer: March 10 – see website for details.

 

PUBLIC SERVICE

The American India Foundation’s William J. Clinton Fellowship for Service in India is committed to developing the next generation of leaders. Through AIF’s 10 month fellowship in India, Clinton Fellows are equipped with a practical, field-based knowledge of development. These fellows will become life-long ambassadors for service to the marginalized & underserved in India. The Fellowship pairs a select number of young professionals with credible NGOs and social enterprises in India in order to accelerate impact and create effective projects that are replicable, scalable, and sustainable.  Together, AIF’s Clinton Fellows and development sector leaders form dynamic partnerships to exchange technical skills and knowledge, as well as their passion, commitment, and new ways of looking at the world; ultimately transforming both the individual and organization.  Applications accepted from American citizens, Indian Citizens, and US Permanent Residents who have completed their undergraduate studies and are under the age of 34. AIF prioritizes both professional experience as well as a strong commitment to India’s development. Ideal candidates come from a variety of backgrounds, both professional and academic. Knowledge of an Indian language is not required, but is a consideration in selection of fellows.
Deadline:  January – see website for details.

The Capital Fellows Programs are nationally recognized public policy fellowships which offer unique experiences in policy-making and development in each branch of government.  Capital Fellows are placed at some of the highest levels of California state government and assist state legislators, senior-level executive staff, and court administrators with a broad range of public policy issues and projects and are typically given assignments with a significant amount of responsibility and challenges.  Over 2,000 alumni have participated in the Capital Fellows Programs, and the ranks of former fellows include judges; members of the United States Congress and the State Legislature; state and local government officials; corporate executives; community and non-profit leaders; and university professors, administration and staff.  Rooted in experiential learning and public service, Capital Fellows spend 10-11 months as part of a cohort working in a Legislative, Executive or Judicial Branch office.  All Fellows receive a monthly stipend of $2,794, as well as medical, dental and vision benefits; fully-paid enrollment and earn six graduate units; student loan deferment; and upon successful completion of the fellowship, a Graduate Certificate in Applied Policy and Government. Deadline:  February – see website for details.

 

The Davis-Putter Scholarship Fund aids people active in movements for social and economic justice. These need-based scholarships are awarded to students who are able to do academic work at the college or university level or are enrolled in a trade or technical program and who are active in the progressive movement. Early recipients worked for civil rights, against McCarthyism and for peace in Vietnam. Recent grantees have been active in the struggle against racism, sexism, homophobia and other forms of oppression; building the movement for economic justice; and creating peace through international anti-imperialist solidarity. Applicants must have participated in activities in the US, and there is a strong preference for applicants who plan on working in this country.  The maximum grant available from the Davis-Putter Scholarship Fund is $15,000 per year (from July 1 through June 30). Grants are disbursed to cover each separate semester, quarter or term during which the grantee is attending school. Grants must be used in the year they are awarded and cannot be deferred or carried over. Recipients must reapply each year support is sought. Applications must be submitted no later than April 1. Applicants will be informed of decisions in July.
Deadline:  April – see website for details.

The Eben Tisdale Fellowship offers outstanding opportunities for students to learn about high-tech public policy issues with hands-on experience in Washington, D.C.  The Fellowship provides a full scholarship of $8,695 to attend the Business + Government Relations program as well as a $1,000 stipend. Through the Business + Government Relations D.C. Summer Program, Tisdale Fellows will be placed with a high-tech company, firm or trade association, take two classes worth six credits from George Mason University, and live in furnished apartments on George Washington University’s downtown campus. Fellows will also attend weekly issues seminar lunches hosted by Tisdale sponsors, as well as briefings at institutions such as the U.S. Capitol, Department of State, World Bank and Federal Reserve.
Deadline: April – see website for details.

The Echoing Green Fellowship program provides start-up capital and technical assistance to help new leaders launch their organizations and build capacity of their social enterprise. The fellowship provides a stipend of $80,000 for individuals (or $90,000 for 2-person partnerships) paid in four equal installments over two years; a health insurance stipend; a yearly professional development stipend; conferences led by organizational development experts; access to technical support and pro bono partnerships to help grow your organization; a community of like-minded social entrepreneurs and public service leaders, including the Echoing Green network of nearly 500 alumni working all over the world.
Deadline: December – see website for details.

The Florida Gubernatorial Fellows Program is a non-partisan program that immerses students from public and private universities in key areas of state government. During their nine-month tenure in Tallahassee, Fellows receive advanced on-the-job training as well as an invaluable front-line view of the inner workings of government. This program is open to full-time undergraduate (juniors and seniors) and graduate students in Florida State. In order to maintain full-time status, students take courses at Florida State University, online courses, or fulfill internship and directed independent study requirements.
Deadline: Applications for the 2021-2022 class are due by Monday, January 4, 2021 – see website for details.

The Greenlining Fellowship Program is an 11-month training program for emerging leaders interested in learning to take the lead on race and advocate for change on a systemic level. Fellows are assigned to specific policy program areas and develop expertise with the direction of a policy director and the Academy Director. Each Fellowship experience is unique and is shaped by the current policy focus of their program area. Although the curriculum is similar to that of the Associates program, Fellows are given more responsibility and independence to implement projects and programs. The learning environment is based on combining experiential learning opportunities, individual development and team participation. Fellows participate in leadership and skills development workshops, attend meetings with key stakeholders, and conduct site visits to community, government, and corporate entities. Fellows receive regular mentorship, professional and personal skill development, and are given opportunities to interact with the media, write reports/press releases, fundraise, testify at policy hearings, and participate in key meetings with top government officials, corporate CEOs, and political leaders.  Fellows participate in personal and professional development workshops that teach participants essential skills that will strengthen their capacity to contribute to their Greenlining experience as well as enhance their future opportunities.
Deadline: February – see website for details.

 

The Samuel Huntington Public Service Award provides $15,000 stipends for graduating college seniors to pursue one year of public service anywhere in the world. The award allows recipients to engage in a meaningful public service activity for one year before proceeding on to graduate school or a career.
Deadline: January – see website for details.

 

The PPIA Junior Summer Institute (JSI) Fellowship Program is a rigorous academic graduate level preparation program for undergraduate juniors committed to public service careers. The program was started to address the lack of diversity across the spectrum of professional public service, including government, nonprofits, public policy institutions, and international organizations. The purpose of the JSI Fellowship is to prepare students to obtain a Master’s or joint degree, in public policy, public administration, international affairs, or a related field.
Deadline: November – see website for details.

The Herbert Scoville Jr. Peace Fellowship, established in 1987, is a highly-competitive national fellowship program that provides recent college and graduate school alumni with the opportunity to gain a Washington perspective on key issues of peace and security. Twice yearly, the fellowship’s Board of Directors selects a group of outstanding individuals to spend six to nine months in Washington. Supported by a salary, the fellows serve as full-time junior staff members at the participating organization of their choice.  The program also arranges meetings for the fellows with policy experts. Many former Scoville Fellows have gone on to pursue graduate degrees in international relations and related fields and taken prominent positions in the field of peace and security with public-interest organizations, the federal government, academia, and media. To date, 190 fellowships have been awarded.
Deadlines: Fall and Spring – see website for details.

 

The Harry S. Truman Scholarship* – Truman Scholars are “agents of change.” The Truman Scholarship is a federally funded scholarship granted to U.S. college juniors with exceptional leadership potential who are committed to careers in government, the nonprofit or advocacy sectors, education or elsewhere in the public service.  The Truman Scholarship is the most highly competitive American fellowship to support graduate education and leadership development. Truman Scholars receive up to $30,000 for graduate or professional school, participate in leadership development activities, and have special opportunities for internships and employment with the federal government. All candidates for the Truman must be nominated by their undergraduate institution.
Deadline: February – see website for details.
* Requires Institutional Review or Endorsement

The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars is a leading nonprofit educational institution headquartered in Washington, D.C. It provides undergraduates, graduate students and professionals from the U.S. and abroad academic seminars on special topics and internship-centered academic terms. Offered primarily in Washington, D.C. and selected cities abroad, the internship programs consist of a substantive work experience tailored to the student’s interests, academic coursework, and civic and leadership programming.
Deadline:  Spring: October; Summer: February; Fall: May – see website for details.

 

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, MATHEMATICS (STEM)

Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate provides a searchable database for programs and professional development resources for current and prospective undergraduate students in STEM and Social and Behavioral Science fields — research experiences for undergraduates (REU), scholarships, and travel and research opportunities.
Deadline:  See website for details.

The Amgen Scholars Program aims to open the door to research opportunities at 24 host institutions for undergraduates from any four-year college or university in a given region. Undergraduate participants benefit from undertaking a research project under top faculty, being part of a cohort-based experience of seminars and networking events, and taking part in a symposium in their respective region where they meet their peers, learn about biotechnology, and hear from leading scientists.
Deadline: February – see website for details.

Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL) plans to start recruiting for The Environmental Health Laboratory Fellowship Program in late 2020/early 2021. The Environmental Health Laboratory Fellowship Program, sponsored by APHL and CDC, trains and prepares scientists for careers in public health laboratories and supports public health initiatives related to human chemical exposures through targeted biomonitoring or environmental health surveillance. The fellowship’s mission is to provide a high-quality training experience for the fellow while providing workforce capacity to the public health laboratory community. The program is a one-year full-time working fellowship for bachelor’s- or master’s-degree level scientists, with the option for a second year providing available funding. Fellows are placed in local and state public health laboratories throughout the US to receive training in bench-level laboratory skills and methods and assist with high-priority environmental health testing, surveillance, and exposure assessment. Fellows will gain an understanding of the public health laboratory system and how it relates to environmental health, exposure reduction, surveillance and intervention. Fellows receive a stipend, allowances for: medical insurance, travel to the host laboratory, professional development and; complimentary student membership to APHL. Applicants must be US citizens or permanent residents. Applicants must hold (or expect to complete by the program start date) a recent bachelor’s or master’s-level degree (for example, MS, MPH, or MSPH) in biology, microbiology, virology, chemistry, public health or a related discipline. The degree must have been received within the last 5 years.  Applicants must be able to start their appointment at the host laboratory following the program timeline.
Deadline: February – see website for details.

 

The DAAD Research Internship in Science and Engineering (RISE) is a summer internship program for undergraduate students from the United States, Canada and the UK in the fields of biology, chemistry, physics, earth sciences and engineering. It offers unique opportunities for undergraduate students to work with research groups at universities and top research institutions across Germany for a period of 2 to 3 months during the summer. RISE interns are matched with doctoral students whom they assist and who serve as their mentors. The working language will be English. All scholarship holders receive stipends from the DAAD to help cover living expenses, while partner universities and research institutes provide housing assistance.
Deadline: See website for details.

The Geoscience Policy program represents the shared interests of the geoscience community in Washington, DC, and actively works with Congress and federal agencies to foster better communication and public policy for the geosciences in areas including water, energy and mineral resources, natural hazards, environmental protection, and federal funding for geoscience research and education.  AGI seeks outstanding geoscience or geo-related engineering students or entry level graduates (Bachelor’s or Master’s level) with a strong interest in federal science policy for the Geoscience Policy Internship. Interns will have the opportunity to hone their writing and web publishing skills, while gaining first-hand policy experience and improving their understanding of the legislative and government operational process. AGI accepts one Geoscience Policy Intern for the fall term (September through December), the spring term (January through April), and the summer term (May through August). The start date is flexible and will be determined based on the schedule of the successful applicant. Applicants must be currently enrolled in or recent graduates of a geoscience-related undergraduate or graduate degree program. For spring and fall internships, BA/BS or MA/MS students with an interest in energy and natural resource issues are particularly encouraged to apply, and may obtain credit for the internship from their university where possible. Salary Grade/Level: $5,000 for 12 weeks (Summer) / $5,500 for 14 weeks (Spring, Fall).
Deadline:  Summer: March 15; Fall: April 15; Spring: Oct. 15 – see website for details.

 

The Goldwater Scholarship Program*, one of the oldest and most prestigious national scholarships in the natural sciences, engineering and mathematics in the United States, seeks to identify and support college sophomores and juniors who show exceptional promise of becoming this Nation’s next generation of research leaders in these fields. The characteristics the Foundation seeks in a Goldwater Scholar include:  1) strong commitment to a research career in the natural sciences, mathematics and engineering; 2) effective display of intellectual intensity in the sciences, mathematics and engineering, and; 3) potential for a significant future contribution to research in his/her chosen field.  Scholarships of up to $7,500 a year are provided to help cover costs associated with tuition, mandatory fees, books, room and board. A sophomore who receives a Goldwater Scholarship will receive up to $7,500 in each of his/her junior and senior years. A junior who receives a Goldwater Scholarship will receive up to $7,500 in his/her senior year.  Students who are nominated who do not receive a scholarship but who show particular promise will be recognized with an Honorable Mention. Students who receive an Honorable Mention do not receive financial support.
Deadline: January – see website for details.
* Requires Institutional Review or Endorsement

The Graduate Fellowships for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Diversity (GFSD) provide support for two or three years, or for a full six years, depending on the employer-sponsor. If the initial support is for the shorter period, it may be extended up to six years at the discretion of the employer.  The charge to the employer for each student supported is $27,000 annually, of which $20,000 is the fellow’s expense allowance and $7,000 is GFSD’s fee to support its operations. The charge is subject to change at the discretion of the GFSD Board of Directors.  Though the fields supported can vary annually depending on employer needs, in general GFSD covers the following: Astronomy, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geology, Materials Science, Mathematical Sciences, Physics, and their subdisciplines, and related engineering fields: Chemical, Computer, Electrical, Environmental, Mechanical.  Fellowships can be used at any participating GFSD University or College.  GFSD welcomes applications from any qualified U.S. citizen who has the ability to pursue graduate work at an GFSD university associate. Applicants at any stage of their graduate program may apply, as long as they will be available to accept two summers of paid internship. Those who already possess a doctoral degree are ineligible.  Employers may nominate GFSD fellows directly, obviating the selection process. These fellows may enroll for either a Master’s or a PhD degree.
Deadline: November – see website for details.

 

The Hertz Graduate Fellowship Program provide support to students of the applied physical, biological and engineering sciences who are citizens or permanent residents of the United States of America, and who are willing to morally commit to make their skills available to the United States in time of national emergency. The Foundation supports graduate students working towards the Ph.D. degree in the applied physical, biological and engineering sciences. These fields include applied mathematics, statistics, and quantitative aspects of modern biology. The Graduate Fellowship Award is based on merit (not need) and consists of a cost-of-education allowance and a personal-support stipend. College seniors wishing to pursue the Ph.D. degree in any of the fields of particular interest to the Foundation, as well as graduate students already in the process of doing so, may apply.  The Fellowship provides full tuition renewable for 5 years and a $31,000/yr stipend. Deadline:  October – see website for details.

The Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship (MLEF) Program provides students with educational opportunities to gain real-world, hands-on research experience with the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy. The MLEF program was created in 1995 with the goal of improving opportunities for under-represented and minority students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. All eligible candidates are encouraged to apply.  The mission of the MLEF program is to strengthen a diverse pipeline of future STEM professionals, and this program has mentored several hundred of the best and brightest students from across the nation for future careers in STEM.  As a MLEF participant, you will train under the mentorship of scientists and engineers while working on mission-focused research projects. During the 10-week appointment, you will receive a weekly stipend, and may be eligible for housing and travel allowances. You will also gain insight into how the Department of Energy is working to meet the energy challenges of the future.

Deadline: January – see website for details.

The University of Arizona Minimizing Health Disparities (MDH) Undergraduate Summer  Program provides a research experience for students from underrepresented groups interested in careers in biomedical research, with a focus on minority health disparities.  10 weeks, $4,000 stipend, research credit, on-campus housing available.
Deadline: January – see website for details.

 

NASA internships and fellowships leverage NASA’s unique missions and programs to enhance and increase the capability, diversity and size of the nation’s future science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workforce. Internships are available from high school to graduate level. Internships provide students with the opportunity to participate in either research or other experiential learning, under the guidance of a mentor at NASA.
Deadline: October – see website for details.

The National Institutes of Health Oxford-Cambridge Scholars Program is an accelerated, individualized doctoral training program for outstanding science students committed to biomedical research careers. The program is based on the British system in which students perform doctoral research without required formal courses other than those which students choose to take in relationship to their own interests. Students selected for admission to the program have already developed a sophisticated scientific background by having engaged in research as undergraduates.
Deadline:  See website for details

 

The NIH Postbac IRTA program (CRTA, Cancer Research Training Award, in the National Cancer Institute) provides recent college graduates who are planning to apply to graduate or professional (medical/dental/pharmacy/nursing/veterinary, etc.) school an opportunity to spend one or two years performing full-time research at the NIH. Postbac IRTAs/CRTAs work side-by-side with some of the leading scientists in the world, in an environment devoted exclusively to biomedical research. The NIH consists of the 240-bed Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center and more than 1100 laboratories/research projects, located on the main campus in Bethesda, MD and the surrounding area as well as in Baltimore and Frederick, MD; Research Triangle Park, NC; Hamilton, MT; Framingham, MA; Phoenix, AZ; and Detroit, MI.
Deadline: January – see website for details.

 

NIH Training Programs in the Biomedical Sciences.  Opportunities include Summer Internship Program (SIP), Undergraduates Scholarship Program, and Post-baccalaureate training programs that provide biomedical research opportunities to recent graduates.
Deadline: See website for details.

 

The NIH Undergraduate Scholarship Program provides up to $20,000/year (renewable) for students from disadvantaged backgrounds who are interested in careers in biomedical, behavioral, or social science health-related research.
Deadline: February – see website for details.

 

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) offers a number of opportunities for summer study/internships, undergraduate scholarships, and scholarships for graduate study.  See website for details, and links to specific programs.
Deadline:  See website for details.

 

The NOAA Hollings Scholarship Program provides successful undergraduate applicants with awards that include academic assistance (up to $9,500 per year) for two years of full-time study and a 10-week, full-time paid ($700/week) internship at a NOAA facility during the summer.  The internship between the first and second years of the award provides the scholars with hands-on, practical experience in NOAA-related science, research, technology, policy, management, and education activities. Awards also include travel funds to attend a mandatory NOAA Scholarship Program orientation and the annual Science & Education Symposium, scientific conferences where students present their research, and a housing subsidy for scholars who do not reside at home during the summer internship.
Deadline:  See website for details.

The National Science Foundation – Graduate Research Fellowship Program (NSF-GRFP) recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and Social and Behavioral Science disciplines who are pursuing research-based Master’s and doctoral degrees at accredited United States institutions.
Deadlines: October 19-23, depending on field; see website for details.

The National Science Foundation-Research Experiences for Undergraduates (NSF-REU) program supports active research participation by undergraduate students in any of the areas of research funded by the NSF. An REU Site consists of a group of ten or so undergraduates who work in the research programs of the host institution. Each student is associated with a specific research project, where he/she works closely with the faculty and other researchers. Students are granted stipends and, in many cases, assistance with housing and travel. Students must contact the individual REU sites for information and application materials.
Deadlines:  Check specific program listing for details.

The Science, Mathematics And Research for Transformation (SMART) Scholarship for Service Program has been established by the Department of Defense (DoD) to support undergraduate and graduate students pursuing degrees in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines. The program aims to increase the number of civilian scientists and engineers working at DoD laboratories.  Candidates should be pursuing degrees/careers in the following fields:  Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering; Biosciences; Chemical Engineering; Chemistry; Civil Engineering; Cognitive, Neural, and Behavioral Sciences; Computer and Computational Sciences; Electrical Engineering; Geosciences; Industrial and Systems Engineering; Information Sciences; Materials Science and Engineering; Mathematics; Mechanical Engineering; Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering; Nuclear Engineering; Oceanography; Operations Research, and Physics.  The SMART Scholarship provides:  Full tuition and education related fees (does not include items such as meal plans, housing, or parking); a cash award paid at a rate of $25,000 – $38,000 depending on degree pursuing (may be prorated depending on award length); paid summer internships; health Insurance reimbursement allowance up to $1,200 per calendar year; book allowance of $1,000 per academic year; mentoring; and employment placement after graduation.
Deadline:  December – see website for details.

The Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships (SULI) program encourages undergraduate students and recent graduates to pursue science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers by providing research experiences at the Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories. Selected students participate as interns appointed at one of 17 participating DOE laboratories/facilities. They perform research, under the guidance of laboratory staff scientists or engineers, on projects supporting the DOE mission.
Deadline: See website for details.

Short-Term Research Experience for Underrepresented Persons (STEP-UP) Program provides hands-on summer research experience for high school and undergraduate students interested in exploring research careers.

  • 8 to 10 weeks of full-time research experience
  • Students receive a summer research stipend
  • Students are assigned to a STEP-UP Coordinating Center to help coordinate and monitor their summer research experience
  • Students are paired with experienced research mentors at institutions throughout the nation
  • Students are encouraged to choose a research institution and/or mentor near their hometown or within commuting distance of their residence. Students are not required to relocate in order to conduct their summer research.
  • Students receive training in the responsible conduct of research
  • All-paid travel expenses to the Annual STEP-UP Research Symposium held on NIH’s main campus in Bethesda, Maryland. Students are given the opportunity to conduct a formal oral and poster presentation.

The STEP-UP Program is a federally funded program managed and supported by the Office of Minority Health Research Coordination (OMHRC) in the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney (NIDDK) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The overall goal of STEP-UP is to build and sustain a biomedical, behavioral, clinical and social science research pipeline focused on NIDDK’s core mission areas of diabetes, endocrinology and metabolic diseases; digestive diseases and nutrition; kidney, urologic and hematologic diseases.
Deadline:  See website for details.

The Office of Biomedical Graduate Programs at Wayne State University School of Medicine offers a SURE (Summer Undergraduate Research Experience). SURE provides valuable hands-on research experience to undergraduate students who are interested in exploring their career options in the field of biomedical science. Students and mentors are matched based on a student’s educational and laboratory experience, as well as shared interests. SURE is a 10- to 12-week experience with a flexible starting date to accommodate your academic schedule. While no housing allowance is provided, a $2,500 stipend is awarded to successful applicants who are rising sophomores, juniors or seniors and U.S. citizens.
Deadline: See website for details.

The Udall Scholarship* – The Udall Foundation awards scholarships to college sophomores and juniors for leadership, public service, and commitment to issues related to Native American nations or to the environment. In 2020, the Udall Foundation anticipates awarding 55 scholarships of up to $7,000 each. The Udall scholarship honors the legacies of Morris Udall and Stewart Udall, whose careers had a significant impact on Native American self-governance, health care, and the stewardship of public lands and natural resources. Udall Scholars are selected on the basis of: Commitment to a career related to the environment, or to tribal public policy, or to American Indian health care; Leadership, public service, consensus building, and integrity; Academic achievement; and an understanding of the Udall legacy, demonstrated through the application essay.
Deadline: March – see website for details.
* Requires Institutional Review or Endorsement

The Summer in Biomedical Science (SIBS) Undergraduate Research Program provides the opportunity for young people to be instructed in the techniques of modern biology while becoming integrated members of a vibrant clinical and scientific community.  Fifteen students who will be sophomore or junior level college undergraduates in March will be accepted into an 8-week paid summer program to work with faculty members on mentored research projects. US Citizens or Permanent Residents are eligible to apply; International Students are not eligible. SIBS participants will receive a stipend of $3,200 for their participation in the program. Campus housing will be provided but travel expenses are not covered.
Deadline: February – see website for details.

The University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) Summer Undergraduate Research Program is a non-credit, ten-week, structured research experience sponsored by UMMS Office of Outreach Programs. The program consists of “hands-on” laboratory research with an investigator serving as a mentor, role model and advisor.  The Summer Undergraduate Research Program is funded by the National Institute of Health (NIH) and UMMS Provost’s Office Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE).  The program is designed to provide participants in-depth exposure to actual bio medical research. Participants will create career-building connections between researchers, post docs, graduate students, and peers. The program encourages participants to consider biomedical research as a viable career choice. Program provides 1) Intense research experience in state of the art laboratories; 2) a stipend of $4000; 3) Travel and housing; 4) Transportation to and from the campus. Participants prepare and present a professional research poster.
Deadline: See website for details.

 

The Vanderbilt Summer Science Academy (VSSA) gives college students earning a four-year degree the opportunity to participate in both research and clinical patient care at an academic medical center. This program is designed for students who are interested in a career in medicine. Participants will complete a research project under the leadership of a research mentor and also directly observe clinical patient care while spending time with resident and attending physicians.  There are two major tracks within the VSSA: the Basic Science Programs for undergraduates interested in careers in research and the Undergraduate Clinical Research Internship Program for undergraduates who wish to pursue a career in medicine. Participation in any one of the Summer Science Academy programs is a valuable learning experience that enhances a student’s skills and makes him or her more competitive for acceptance to frontline graduate programs.
Deadline:  See website for details.

The Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellowship seeks to attract talented, committed individuals with backgrounds in the STEM fields—science, technology, engineering, and mathematics—into teaching in high-need secondary schools in Pennsylvania. The Fellowship has also prepared over a thousand teachers in Georgia, Indiana, Michigan, New Jersey, and Ohio. Eligible applicants include current undergraduates, recent college graduates, mid-career professionals, and retirees who have majored in, or have extensively studied, one or more of the STEM fields.
Deadline: October, December, January – see website for details.

SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate provides a searchable database for programs and professional development resources for current and prospective undergraduate students in Social and Behavioral Science and STEM fields — research experiences for undergraduates (REU), scholarships, and travel and research opportunities.
Deadline:  See website for details.

 

The Minority Fellows Program (MFP) is a fellowship competition for individuals from underrepresented backgrounds applying to or in the early stages of doctoral programs in political science. The MFP was established in 1969 (originally as the Black Graduate Student Fellowship) to increase the number of African American graduate students in the discipline. In 1979 the Chicano Student Fellowship was established. Overtime, the fellowship program has expanded to include support for racial and ethnic underrepresented scholars. Since its inception, the APSA MFP has designated more than 600 fellows and contributed to the successful completion of doctoral political science programs for over 100 individuals.
Deadline:  October – see website for details.

 

American Psychological Association provides various scholarships to support research and study at the graduate level in psychology.
Deadline:  See website for details

The National Science Foundation – Graduate Research Fellowship Program (NSF-GRFP) recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students in NSF-supported Social and Behavioral Science and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines who are pursuing research-based Master’s and doctoral degrees at accredited United States institutions.
Deadlines: October 19-23, depending on field; see website for details.

Through the National Science Foundation – Research Experience for Undergraduates (NSF-REU) program, the NSF funds a large number of research opportunities for undergraduate students in the Social and Behavioral Sciences. An REU Site consists of a group of ten or so undergraduates who work in the research programs of the host institution. Each student is associated with a specific research project, where he/she works closely with the faculty and other researchers. Students are granted stipends and, in many cases, assistance with housing and travel.  Undergraduate students supported with NSF funds must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States or its possessions.
Deadline: Rolling (February – March) – see website for details.

Short-Term Research Experience for Underrepresented Persons (STEP-UP) Program provides hands-on summer research experience for high school and undergraduate students interested in exploring research careers.

  • 8 to 10 weeks of full-time research experience
  • Students receive a summer research stipend
  • Students are assigned to a STEP-UP Coordinating Center to help coordinate and monitor their summer research experience
  • Students are paired with experienced research mentors at institutions throughout the nation
  • Students are encouraged to choose a research institution and/or mentor near their hometown or within commuting distance of their residence. Students are not required to relocate in order to conduct their summer research.
  • Students receive training in the responsible conduct of research
  • All-paid travel expenses to the Annual STEP-UP Research Symposium held on NIH’s main campus in Bethesda, Maryland. Students are given the opportunity to conduct a formal oral and poster presentation.

The STEP-UP Program is a federally funded program managed and supported by the Office of Minority Health Research Coordination (OMHRC) in the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney (NIDDK) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The overall goal of STEP-UP is to build and sustain a biomedical, behavioral, clinical and social science research pipeline focused on NIDDK’s core mission areas of diabetes, endocrinology and metabolic diseases; digestive diseases and nutrition; kidney, urologic and hematologic diseases.
Deadline:  See website for details.

STUDY ABROAD

The Bridging Project offers scholarships to American undergraduate students participating in study-abroad programs in Japan. Funding from private foundations and major U.S. corporations, through donations to the nonprofit US-Japan Bridging Foundation, makes it possible to award about 100 scholarships each year to assist students with the travel and living expenses they will incur while studying abroad in Japan for a semester or an academic year. Applications are accepted twice a year for Bridging Scholarships.  Undergraduate students majoring in any field of study are eligible to apply for Bridging Scholarships. Japanese language study is not a prerequisite. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and must be enrolled as undergraduates in a college or university in the United States before and during the time they are studying abroad. Their study in Japan must last for at least 3 months and must earn credit that will transfer to their home campus in the US.  Bridging Scholarship recipients receive a stipend of $2,500 (for students on semester-long programs) or $4,000 (for students on academic year programs). Students studying in Japan on summer programs are not eligible to apply.
Deadline:  See website for details.

 

The Freeman-ASIA program* is designed to support U.S.-based undergraduates with demonstrated financial need who are planning to study abroad in East or Southeast Asia. The program’s goal is to increase the number of U.S. citizens and permanent residents with first-hand exposure to and understanding of Asia and its peoples and cultures.
Deadline: April – see website for details.
* Requires Institutional Review or Endorsement

The Fulbright UK Summer Institutes are three or four week programmes for US undergraduate students. Participants can explore the culture, heritage and history of the UK while experiencing higher education at a UK university.
Deadline: February – see website for details.

The U.S. Department of State’s Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship Program* enables students of limited financial means to study or intern abroad, providing them with skills critical to our national security and economic prosperity. The Institute of International Education has administered the program since its inception in 2001.
Deadline: October and March – see website for details.
* Requires Institutional Review or Endorsement