CYC (chart your course):                                                                     
new college’s cuRRICULUM for the liberal arts

Are You Ready to Chart Your Course?

At almost every college and university an undergraduate education includes, at the very least, a concentration or “major” field of study in which a student acquires in-depth knowledge of a rather focused academic area, and a program of general education through which the student achieves academic breadth and acquires important intellectual skills. Instead of a one-size-fits-all set of requirements, however, New College offers students the opportunity to Chart Your Course (CYC).

This signature program is your introduction to New College—a foundation for your first years that will prepare you to excel in the future. It is designed to give you a competitive leg up in the job market while inspiring you with intellectually challenging courses.

With CYC, you will create your own learning plan alongside your faculty adviser, and develop a roadmap that is tailored to your academic and future ambitions. Maybe you want to take a sociology class that will also teach you math, or a chemistry class that will help you sharpen your writing skills? At New College we want you to make your college course requirements work for you: tailor them to your desired college experience with the future in mind!

Today’s workforce needs candidates who are adaptable to fast-changing trends—employees who can think on their feet, shed new light on old ideas and develop solutions to emerging problems. No matter what you choose to study during your four years at New College, you will come away with a broadly-based liberal arts and sciences education, and a variety of interdisciplinary skills. You will then reflect on these skills and learn how they can be applied to a variety of careers.

CYC will give you a map to explore your world, and help you chart your own progress along the way.  Click here for a downloadable PDF summary of the CYC program!

How does it work?

The CYC program works on two different but intertwined levels: at the same time as you’re taking courses in a broad range of disciplines, you’ll be developing key skills that will help you succeed at New College and beyond. Every CYC course is labeled with the 3 chief skills it teaches, such as problem-solving, intercultural knowledge or writing—so you can search for courses by the skill you want to practice (ex. teamwork) as well as by discipline (ex. anthropology). This makes it easy to choose courses that make the most sense for you, understand what your professors are trying to teach you, and articulate everything you’ve learned along the way.

What are these skills, and why are they important?

CYC skills are essential skills that all students need to succeed in work, citizenship and life (here’s how the American Association of Colleges and Universities defines them). Rather than rigid professional training for a single job, CYC will give you a toolbox of techniques to help you succeed at anything you want to do in life. In fact, these techniques are the flexible soft skills most employers are looking for these days (such as Key Skills Employers Want to See on Students’ Resumés and Forbes’ Top Ten Skills Recruiters Are Looking For in 2021). Here’s the list we’re using:

Every CYC course focuses explicitly on three of these skills, and you have a lot of control over your choices. You can decide to practice a few of these skills in depth, or acquire a broad range of different skills.

How will CYC affect me?

 

If you’re a prospective student, or a student starting in Fall 2021 or later:


Do CYC requirements apply to me? 

  • Yes! While continuing students are still subject to the old Liberal Arts Curriculum (LAC), CYC requirements—a total of 10 total units—apply to all students starting this fall and later. Here’s a summary:

  • Transfer and exam credit, such as AP and IB exams or community college courses, CAN be applied to CYC. (See below for details!)
  • You will soon be able to track your completion of CYC requirements in the “Reports” tab of the Student Evaluation System (SES). We hope to have this feature functional by spring term 2022.
  • This part of the program gives you experience in a variety of disciplines and helps you find passions in areas you might never have explored.

How will I know if a course counts toward CYC requirements?

  • The Class Schedule labels all CYC courses with a series of attributes. These will tell you:
    • whether a given course fulfills CYC requirements;
    • which breadth requirements it satisfies (attributes CYC-Humanities, CYC-Social Sciences, CYC-Natural Sciences, CYC-Math, CYC-Writing, Diverse Perspectives);
    • and—for CYC courses only—which skills they will teach.
  • If you’re looking at a particular course, these attributes will help you understand what skills that course focuses on and what breadth requirements it fulfills.
  • You can also search by skill to help you choose courses that teach the skills you want to practice. Knowing what skills your courses are designed to teach you will help you articulate the kinds of broad skills you’re learning at NCF.
  • This part of the program helps you focus on and develop the skills that will best suit you in the future.

How else will the CYC program benefit me?

  • In the process of creating your contract each term, you’ll be asked to reflect on your progress. This required “Reflection” section of the contract asks you to consider: What are you trying to accomplish? What knowledge and skills have you gained, and how will they help you in future? The contract is an opportunity to think back to how you’ve grown and forward to how those experiences will shape your future. You should write this reflection—or at least begin doing so—before meeting with your advisor to plan your courses each term. At the same time, talking with your adviser about your reflection will help you get the most out of your advising experience!
  • The revised Preliminary AOC (PAOC) form, which you will complete in your fifth contract (about halfway through the traditional four years at NCF) will ask you not only to declare an Area of Concentration (AOC), but also to reflect holistically on where you started, how far you’ve come and where you want to go next.
  • This part of the program helps you look both backward and forward, and consider how you can apply your skills in the real world.

If you are a transfer student, there are a few extra things you need to know:

  • If you have an AA from a Florida state institution, that counts as having completed all CYC requirements. You’re done!
  • If you don’t have an AA, or your transfer credits come from a private or out-of-state institution, the Registrar’s Office will make a determination about what credit you will receive based on your existing transcript. This goes for CYC courses as well as contracts and more general transfer credit.
  • As a rule, introductory or gen-ed courses from other institutions count to fulfill CYC requirements. The exceptions are Math (where NCF requires trigonometry or higher) and Writing (where NCF requires a course at the 200(0)-level or higher).


If you’re a continuing student who started at New College before Fall 2021:


Do CYC requirements apply to me? 

  • No! The requirements of the Liberal Arts Curriculum (LAC) still apply to anyone who started before Fall 2021. These are:
    • 8 LAC courses total
    • 1 LAC course from each division
    • 1 Diverse Perspectives course
    • Math requirement
    • Writing requirement (fulfilled by completion of the senior thesis and passing your baccalaureate exam)
    • Civic Literacy requirement (fulfilled by transfer credit or exam)
  • As before, you can track your completion of LAC requirements in the “Reports” tab of the Student Evaluation System (SES).

So how will the CYC program benefit me?

  • The Class Schedule has been updated. The old system of marking each LAC course with an asterisk is being retired, and all LAC and CYC courses are now trackable using attributes attached to each course. These will tell you:
    • whether a given course fulfills LAC and/or CYC requirements;
    • and which skills CYC courses will teach.
  • If you’re looking at a particular course, these attributes will help you understand what skills that course focuses on and what breadth requirements it fulfills.
  • You can also search by skill to help you choose courses that teach the specific skills you want to practice. Knowing what skills your courses are designed to teach you will help you articulate the kinds of broad skills you’re learning at NCF.
  • Also starting this fall, you’ll notice new elements to the e-contract and the Preliminary AOC (PAOC) form.
    • Starting in Fall 2021, the “Goals” section of the e-contract is being replaced by a “Reflection”, a required question that explicitly asks you to reflect on your progress: What knowledge and skills have you gained, and how will they help you in future? What are your goals, and what do you still need to work on to accomplish them? The contract is an opportunity to think back to how you’ve grown and forward to how those experiences will shape your future. You should write this reflection—or at least begin doing so—before meeting with your advisor to plan your courses each term. At the same time, talking with your adviser about your reflection will help you get the most out of your advising experience!
    • Also, the revised Preliminary AOC form, which students complete in their fifth contract (about halfway through the traditional four years at NCF) will ask you in the same way not only to declare an AOC, but also to reflect holistically on where you started, how far you’ve come, and where you want to go next.
    • These elements will help you plan a path that makes sense for you, understand what you’ve learned and how you might apply it in future, and explain your choices to audiences beyond New College.

Who do I ask if I have questions?

  • About your learning path at New College and how LAC and/or CYC can contribute to your growth >> your faculty advisor.
  • About particular LAC and/or CYC courses that you’re interested in taking >> the professors teaching them.
  • About what your transfer credit counts for and what requirements you still have to complete >> the Registrar’s Office (records@ncf.edu or 941-487-4230). You can also click here to see our current transfer credit guidelines.

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Fulfilling CYC Breadth Requirements by Transfer Credit or Exam


Exemption through Other College Credit

Appropriate courses completed through other colleges (including dual-enrollment college courses taken while enrolled in high school) may be used to satisfy CYC breadth requirements, as long as they are deemed eligible for transfer credit by the New College Registrar. The Registrar will work with you to determine which courses completed at other institutions may be appropriate.

Exemption by Examination

Satisfactory performance on Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), Advanced International Certification of Education (AICE), or College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) examinations may be used to meet CYC requirements. In the event that a student has taken two different exams on the same subject (i.e. IB and an AP, or AICE and AP), credit for only one satisfactory score may be given toward the corresponding CYC requirement. Here are the ways in which you can use exam credit to satisfy CYC requirements:

The CYC Mathematics requirement can be fulfilled by any of the following:

  • A score of 530 or above on the mathematics section of the Redesigned SAT (administered as of March 2016)
  • A score of 500 or above on the mathematics section of the SAT Reasoning Test, the re-centered SAT I, or its equivalent
  • A score of 21 or above on the mathematics section of the ACT
  • A score of 91 or above on the ACCUPLACER Elementary Algebra exam
  • A score of 3 on any Advanced Placement (AP) mathematics exam
  • A score of 5 or higher on an International Baccalaureate (IB) mathematics exam
  • A score of 50 or higher on a College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) mathematics exam
  • A passing score on the mathematics section of the College Level Academic Skills Test taken prior to July 2009
  • A passing score on the FTCE General Knowledge Exam mathematics section or a score of 91 or higher on the mathematics portion of the Florida College-Level Entry Placement Test
  • A 2.5 grade point average (on a 4.0 scale) in traditional postsecondary-level course work identified by the Florida State Board of Education and Florida Board of Governors as meeting the requirement to demonstrate college-level skills in mathematics. (Contact the Office of the Registrar for details.)
  • Six semester credit hour equivalents of mathematics course work completed at another accredited college or university, and deemed eligible toward transfer credit. (Contact the Office of the Registrar for details.)

Other CYC breadth requirements can be fulfilled with the following exams:

Advanced Placement (AP) Exams; International Baccalaureate (IB); Advanced International Certification of Education (AICE); College Level Examination Program (CLEP)see HERE for a complete list of eligible courses.